16 Poodle Mixed Breeds

Poodles are among the top 10 most popular breeds in the United States, currently residing in the number-seven slot. Their popularity, personality, and appearance have made it so they are among the most common dogs used to create a hybrid or designer dogs. Breeding occurs with all the different varieties of Poodles, including Standard, Toy, and Miniature. Most Poodle mixes are referred to as “Doodles.”

We have compiled a list of the most common, as well as the cutest, mixed breeds you can get by mixing a Poodle.

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1. Cockapoo

Cockapoo
Image Credit: DavidReed, Pixabay

Although still considered a medium-sized dog, a Cocker Spaniel is smaller than others in this size range. The Cocker Spaniel, combined with the Poodle, became a Cockapoo and was one of the first Doodle hybrids from back in the 1950s.

These dogs top out at around 25 pounds and are lapdogs, excellent for a family with young kids. They are friendly dogs that get along with just about everything and everyone from a young age. They love to play around and have a good time.

These dogs are easily distracted and may need extra training to get them to listen well. They are also quite vocal, barking more than other larger dogs because they feel the need to draw attention. Their coats are soft and thick. They can have straight, wavy, or curly coats with brown, black, tan, golden, white, and mottled coloring.


2. Akipoo

The Akita Inu and the Poodle combine to make the Akipoo. The Akipoo, unfortunately, is not one of the more common Poodle hybrids. They are incredibly adorable, though, and can be found if this seems like your perfect match in a canine companion.

Akita Inus are known for their courage and fierce loyalty. These traits carry right over into this mix and combine with the quirky, outgoing personality of the Poodle. They are very smart and have an agile build. They tend to resemble the Akita Inu more closely, with a more pointed, alert face. Their ears can be erect or floppy, though.

Akipoos are typically fluffy and can have straight or wavy fur. Their coats are normally mostly black with tan and white markings, although this can be reversed depending on which parent is favored.


3. Cavapoo

Cavapoo
Image Credit: skeeze, Pixabay

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the Poodle combine to make one perfect teddy bear puppy. The Cavapoo enjoys playing around and is eager to learn, as long as it means getting to spend plenty of quality time with their family. They are prone to separation anxiety if left alone for too long.

This Doodle has the longer legs of the Poodle but has ears that are longer than a Poodle’s and fur that’s longer and softer. They are small, coming up to 25 pounds at most. They can be intelligent and sometimes stubborn dogs.

The Cavapoo dog is often brown, tan, or golden with white markings. They have long, thick, and wavy fur. If the Cavalier parent was dual or tri-colored, the Cavapoo might be too, although such dogs usually are more expensive.


4. Bossi-Poo

The Boston Terrier and the Poodle are bred together to make a Doodle known as the Bossi-Poo. The Bossi-Poo looks quite different from the typical Doodle as they generally favor the Boston Terrier in coat and color more than the Poodle.

Boston Terriers are brachycephalic, meaning that their snouts are shorter and much closer to their face. This facial structure makes it more challenging for them to breathe and eat. These health issues are why they are often bred with different dogs with a longer face, intending to breed these out of the new hybrid.

The Bossi-Poo accomplishes this goal. They are black and white dogs and can have soft, short fur or long, tufty fur. Their ears might be erect or floppy, depending on which parent they favor the most.


5. Maltipoo

Maltipoo
Image Credit: 350543, Pixabay

The Maltipoo is included among the most popular Doodle mixes currently available. They are a cross between Maltese and Poodles. Maltipoos are the smallest Doodle and thus are adaptable to many different lifestyles and living conditions. It helps that they are also absolutely adorable.

The Maltipoo is the perfect size to travel well and fits into apartments, even with an entire family living there. They are not aggressive dogs but do like to be vocal, especially if they don’t get the proper training. They are needy, always requiring attention and suffering from anxiety if they are separated from their family for too long.

A Maltipoo has wavy or curly hair, like the Poodle. Their coat can be a variety of colors, such as cream, white, grey, tan, or golden. They need a great deal of stimulation to stay happy and may require grooming.


6. Pyredoodle

Pyredoodles were developed from hybridizing the Great Pyrenees and the Poodle. These dogs are big and fluffy, almost always appearing to smile. The Great Pyrenees is thought to be a giant dog breed, and when they are bred with a Standard Poodle, the hybrid stays large, topping out at over 100 pounds. The good thing is that their heart is just as big as they are.

The Pyredoodles can also be called the Pyreneespoo, the Pyreneesdoodle, or the Pyrepoo. They are surprisingly a more common hybrid. That means that if you are looking for one, check out your local shelter because there is a shot they might be there.

They are adaptable to different living situations, but they do need quite a bit of exercise to keep content. They love children and can display overprotective qualities if they feel like they are being threatened. They often inherit the color of the Great Pyrenees, a stark white, and have wavy, long fur.


7. Sheepadoodle

Sheepadoodle
Image Credit: Ironlion27, Wikimedia Commons

To contrast a few of the more common mixes, there is the Sheepadoodle. Although the name sounds a little like a rooster crowing, it is a hybrid mix of an Old English Sheepdog and a Poodle.

The Sheepadoodle is a larger dog breed, although any Doodle can be bred with a smaller Poodle to make a tinier version. They are friendly and love children. If they are socialized well, they behave well with other dogs. They might have herding urges, depending on which parent their personality favors. These pups don’t adapt well to apartment living.

The Sheepadoodle often looks much like the Sheepdog, instead of having a curly coat like other Doodles do. They have straight to wavy fur and are almost always black and white, with mottled coloring variations between the two colors.


8. Goldendoodle

Goldendoodle
Image Credit: Josh Fields, Pexels

The mix of a Golden Retriever and a Poodle is called a Goldendoodle. Both the Golden Retriever and the Poodle are extremely popular, so of course, their combination is too. This Doodle has a wonderful character” calm but fun-loving. Their eyes speak to their intelligence, and they range from 10 pounds to 80, depending on the Poodle variety.

These dogs don’t shed, so they need extensive grooming to keep their coat healthy and clean. Typically, mixed breeds are not recognized as their own breed. However, the Goldendoodle has become so prolific and popular that they are beginning to be recognized as their own. They make great family pets, although they may need extra training.

Goldendoodles inherit the wavy or curly hair from the Poodle but are often a shade close to their Golden Retriever parent. Be sure to inquire after the Poodle variety from the breeder when investing in these pups so you will know how big they will get.


9. Labradoodle

Labradoodle
Image Credit: Monika Baumgartner, Pexels

A Labradoodle is a mix of a Labrador and a Poodle. They look like a Golden Retriever and a Poodle but have a bit of a different personality. They can be highly energetic dogs, as well as playful and social. They like to be around people as much as possible.

The Labradoodle was initially bred in Australia to be a guide dog for those with disabilities. They are a gorgeous mix and quite smart, with more obedience bred into them than other Doodles. They are an adaptable breed and can be a variety of sizes.

This Doodle has a wide variety of color patterns, although the texture of the coat is similar to the Poodle, wavy or curly. The typical colors include chocolate, white, black, tan, cream, or multicolored.


10. Yorkiepoo

The Yorkiepoo is a combination of a Yorkshire Terrier and a Poodle. They are one of the more common pups among the toy mixes. The mix can be quite a handful, a bit rowdy and vocal yet loving and protective. They need consistent training to behave appropriately.

Yorkie dogs are known to be one of the yappiest dogs out there, helping to give small dog breeds the reputation of being shrill and loud. They need a great deal of training as young as possible to curb this tendency. Yorkiepoos have a large amount of energy and love to play around. It is best to have one of these dogs if you already have other dogs or plan on getting more than one.

Their coat varies depending on the parent that they favor. Either way, they will need some grooming and extra attention around their eyes and mouth. They are often black and tan but can also be cream, white, or brown.


11. Aussiedoodle

Aussiedoodle
Image Credit: F. D. Richards, Flickr

An Aussiedoodle features the mix of an Australian Shepherd and a Poodle. They are typically bred with a Standard Poodle and are medium-sized dogs, although they can be toy pups. These dogs are intelligent and have become quite common, to the point that they are trained and used as service animals.

Aussiedoodles are considered hypoallergenic because they shed so little. There are not many medium- to large-breed dogs that are hypoallergenic, so for people with allergies, this can be an exceptional pup.

The Aussiedoodle is a happy, friendly dog that loves to be cuddled, no matter their size. Their color ranges from grey to cream, white, black, and brown. They often have curly or wavy fur that is thick and needs to be groomed.


12. Saint Berdoodle

The Saint Berdoodle is a remarkable Doodle. A cross between a Saint Bernard and a Poodle equals one giant, fluffy teddy bear. They have loving personalities and tend not to drool as much as their Saint Bernard parentage.

Even if this breed is hybridized with a smaller Poodle variety, the dog still tends to be over 100 pounds. They are an affectionate mix, and it would be hard to find a more devoted and loyal mix. They are typically easy to train because they are eager to please their owners.

The Saint Berdoodle is thick fur that will generally be curly. They need quite a bit of grooming and should be watched during hot seasons. Their coat patterns resemble more of the Saint Bernard, with markings of brown, tan, white, and cream.


13. Schnoodle

Schnoodle
Image Credit: pen_ash, Pixabay

Schnauzers are not a common dog, yet they have found their way into so many different hybrid breeds. The Schnauzer and Poodle make a Schnoodle. The problem with breeding this dog is that they are rarely a 50/50 mix. They need to be bred a couple of times to reach the desired size and fur texture.

Even though they can be harder to obtain, they are cute enough to merit the search. The pups typically resemble the Schnauzer in their facial features and build. They are agile and energetic but still loving and friendly.

The perfected Schnoodle mix has a fluffy coat with a mix of the tufted, straight fur of the Schnauzer and the curly hair of the Poodle. They are often grey and white, although they can be black and have tan markings.


14. Lhasapoo

The Lhasa Apso is one of the oldest known dog breeds, originally coming from the Tibetan monasteries. Mixed with a Poodle, they are called a Lhasapoo. They are not one of the standard Doodle mixes, but that doesn’t mean they don’t deserve more attention.

The Lhasapoo is a dog that is so eager to please that they will make it work no matter what situation they are in. They make fantastic apartment dogs but will happily use a fenced yard if they have access. They are excellent companion dogs, although they can be a bit independent at times, especially if their personality favors the Lhasa.

Lhasapoos have coats that range from curly to straight and have a wide variety of potential color patterns. They can be white, cream, grey, black, brown, and tan.


15. Newfypoo

The Newfypoo is a lovable, large dog that can sometimes resemble a Wookie (of “Star Wars fame) because they are so big and furry. The mix involves a Newfoundland and a Poodle, typically a Standard. The Newfypoo might be big, but they are also rated as one of the best dogs for kids because they are so gentle and considerate.

This Doodle is one of the largest and can weigh up to 150 pounds. There is no possibility of a toy variety in this breed. They are loyal and get along well with any human and even other dogs and cats. They may need a bit of training to play safely, since they often don’t understand their enormous size.

The Newfypoo is a shaggy dog, with a puffy coat as large as they are. They need a great deal of grooming, or this coat can end up tangling easily and becoming a matted mess. They can be white, black, brown, and cream.


16. Bassetoodle

Many of the Doodles look quite similar, no matter what the other half of their parentage equation is. However, if you are looking for a pup that is unique in appearance but is not too hard to find, look no further than the Bassetoodle. This Doodle is a cross between a Basset Hound and a Poodle.

The two breeds look so different that there is a wide range of potential appearances in this dog. They can have curly, medium-length fur like the Poodle or short hair close to the skin like the Basset Hound. They typically have the short legs of the Basset Hound.

This Doodle is calm and friendly and social enough to love being the center of attention. They like to be around other humans and pets, so a busy household is perfect for this breed. They often have the large eyes of the Hound and the long ears as well.

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Although this list is only the start of the hundreds of possible Doodle varieties, it should be comforting that they always make for a great mix. They are happy dogs, and you are almost guaranteed to have the cutest pup on the block. Do keep you and your family’s needs in mind when picking out your Doodle breed, as each breed and puppy has their own personality.


Featured Image: everydoghasastory, Shutterstock