The Dorgi: A Complete Guide

A charming mix of the Dachshund and Corgi, the Dorgi boasts the short, smooth coat of the former and big, perky ears of the latter.

Both breeds being famous for their long bodies and stumpy legs the Dorgi is also very short in stature and makes a perfect lap dog if you can get them to sit still!

They’re bubbly and enjoy constant affection and attention, with plenty of energy to burn they’ll be well loved by children and adults alike.

As a crossbred dog, the Dorgi has inherited traits from both the Dachshund and Corgi, and we can get a better idea of its temperament through examining its parents and their lineage.

While the Corgi is popularly recognized as the favorite dog of Monarch Queen Elizabeth II, it was originally used as a cattle dog, rounding livestock by biting at their heels, which its short stature was perfect for.

The breed, dating all the way back to the 1100s, is an old and renowned breed with a long lineage that includes the Norwegian Elkhound, Finnish Spitz, Pomeranian, and Samoyed.

Long from its past as a sheepherder, the Corgi is now most commonly bred as a companion, popular among both Royals and common owners alike.

The Dachshund has been one of the most popular breeds of dogs since the 1950’s, likely due to its unique yet appealing features and small size.

Although anatomically similar to the Corgi, it was used instead for hunting small burrow-dwelling prey, which it was skilled at due to its small build and digging capabilities.

READ NEXT:  The Ttoodle: A Complete Guide

Initially bred in Germany in the 18th and 19th centuries, its lineage boasts the Pinscher, French Basset Hound, and Braque Francais.

Similar to the Corgi, the Dachshund also has a history of being a famous royal dog, becoming a favorite of Queen Victoria in the 1840s after being sent from Germany to Britain.

As both of their parents, the Dorgi is a fun and small energetic breed that love lots of attention but might not fare too well in a family with small or young children as they become startled easily.

This being said they are very intelligent and train well, regardless of their big personalities.

We’re here to make sure that the Dorgi is the perfect fit for your household with this useful guide that will detail all that you’ll need to know about this vibrant breed.

Dorgi Puppies – Before You Buy…

The Dorgi is the perfect dog for beginner owners.

Before you can even bring a dog back into your house, you need to make it a humble abode. Dogs are thinking, feeling creatures that need your attention, love, and support.

Because of this, you will need to prepare for your dog’s arrival extensively.

Things you will need to prepare to include:

  • A clear, designated area in which your dog can play, and another where it can rest.
  •  A schedule in which either you or a family member can train, socialize and converse with the Dorgi.
  • Your choice of color.
  • Your choice of gender.
  • Your choice of spaying/neutering.

What Price are Dorgi Puppies?

The cost of a dog can be daunting, as they are quite the expensive pet. It can put you off of purchasing a dog altogether.

READ NEXT:  The Mini Foxy Rat Terrier: A Complete Guide

However, it is a worthy investment, as a dog isn’t just an idle trinket on the shelf, but a close, irreplaceable friend that you will have for 10-15 years.

The Dorgi is a cheap alternative to the Corgi and the Dachshund.

So for those who want the cute, sausage aesthetic of a Dachshund, or the companionship of a Corgi, the Dorogi could prove to be a much cheaper alternative.

A Dorgi from a reputable breeder tends to cost about $500-$600. This is much cheaper than the $1000 price points of a Corgi and a Dachshund.

If you are looking for a cheap option to purchase the Dorgi, you should try and seek out one at an adoption clinic. A Dorgi can be as low as $60 at a shelter, with a few excess fees on top.

Where to Find Reputable Dorgi Breeders?

There are various places in which you can go to find a Dorgi breeder. Both its parent breed is incredibly popular, and in our day of age, there are thousands of breeders all around the world.

To determine whether they are reputable comes down to your judgment on their character.

Things you will need to assess include:

  • The space in which the dogs live before they are purchased.
  • How clean and healthy the puppies are.
  • How well the breeder treats and socializes with the puppies.
  •  How much information the breeder has on the particular breed.
  • Whether or not the breeder can assist you with any further tips and tactics.

3 Little-Known Facts About Dorgi Puppies

  1. The Dorgi’s parent breeds the Dachshund is the only breed recognized by the AKC that can hunt above, and below ground.
  2. The Dorgi is known to have a double coat.
  3.  Because of their long torso, the Dorgi is also known as a ‘Sausage Dog.’
READ NEXT:  Braque Du Bourbonnais: A Complete Guide

Physical Traits of the Dorgi

The Dorgi is friendly, funny and a great companion to be around.

The best part of mixed breed dogs is that they can resemble both of their parent breeds.

The Dorgi can look either like a Corgi or a Dachshund, depending on the superior genetics of each particular puppy. This makes purchasing the Dorgi quite exciting!

The Dorgi usually has a medium length coat that is rough, and never usually silky. It ranges colors of pied, red, black, brown and white.

It has small legs and a long torso, giving it somewhat of a wobbly aesthetic. Its ears are usually pointed and triangle, and it usually has a pointy, arched muzzle.

How Big is a Full-Grown Dorgi?

The Dorgi is renowned as a “Sausage Dog.” It has a long torso with tiny legs, and it is quite a humorous looking dog. It fits into the toy breed category, growing anywhere between 9-11 inches long.

The Dorgi is just as light as it is long. It only grows to about 22 pounds in mass, with 19 being the minimum. Both genders tend to be around the same size.

What is the Dorgi ’s Life Expectancy?

The Dorgi tends to have the same life expectancy as that of most small sized breeds.

It is said that the Dorgi can live up to 14 years long, with 12 being the median. This is the same as its parent breeds.

When predicting a lifespan, you always need to take health into account.

A dog’s average lifespan can dwindle due to any serious health conditions and illnesses, so it is important to schedule the occasional trip to the vet and keep your eye out for any possible symptoms or concerns.

READ NEXT:  The Bull Terrier: A Complete Guide

Intelligence, Temperament, and Personality Traits of the Dorgi

The Dorgi has inherited traits from both the Dachshund and Corgi.

The Dorgi is a fun, loving dog that is great with family, and other pets. It tends to be good with children of all ages.

However, it isn’t very tolerant. If a child becomes rough, it may become skittish and might nip in retaliation.

Most of the time, the Dorgi loves to be center of attention. It will follow you around and do anything to make you notice it.

If left alone for too long, the Dorgi is known to suffer from separation anxiety. So it is important to make sure someone is home most of the time.

The Dorgi is fairly easy to train because it loves any attention. However, it does go through phases of stubbornness, meaning that you may have to use positive reinforcement during obedience trials.

The Dorgi will not make a great guard dog due to its love of people.

The Dorgi’s Diet

For a small dog, the Dorgi eats a lot. You will most likely find yourself refilling its cup 2 times a day and spending around $40-$50 a month.

Foods it will enjoy vary from fruits, grains, vegetables, cereals and various dry dog foods. It won’t do too well with meat because of its small stomach.

How Much Exercise Does the Dorgi Need?

The Dorgi is quite active for its size and will need 60 minutes of exercise every day.

This target can be met through various games indoors, and outdoors, with plenty of mental and physical stimulation integrated.

Walking wise, it will only need around 6 miles a week.

READ NEXT:  The Anatolian Pyrenees: A Complete Guide

Dorgi Health and Conditions

Serious Issues:

Minor Issues:

  • Cataracts
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Elbow Dysplasia

My Final Thoughts on the Dorgi

Overall, the Dorgi is the perfect dog for beginner owners.

It poses a little bit of a challenge so you become accustomed to dog training, yet it’s not too hard where it will tip you over the edge.

It is friendly, funny and a great companion to be around.

 

Image Sources: 1, 2, 3

OVERALL SUMMARY

7.5
Cost to Buy
8.5
Cuteness Level
8
Family Safety
8
Friendliness
5.5
Health Concerns
7
Life Span
5
Exercise Required
5.5
Food Required
OVERALL RATING 6.9 / 10

The Dogo Canario: A Complete Guide

The Doxie Chin: A Complete Guide