Can Dogs Eat Dandelions? Are Dandelions Safe for Dogs?

If you are like most dog owners, you want what is best for your pooch, even if that means feeding them fruits, vegetables, and greens. These foods are just as beneficial to dogs as meat because they contain essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that dogs need to thrive as they age. You may notice that beets and sweet potatoes are included in your dog’s dry or wet dog food. That’s because they provide nutrition your dog can benefit from over time.

But you don’t have to rely on commercial food alone to meet the nutritional needs of your furry family member. It’s always a good idea to offer fresh fruits, veggies, and greens as a snack to supplement your dog’s meals. You may be wondering what kinds of greens you should be feeding your dog. How about dandelion greens? They are a great supplement option for pooches! Continue reading to learn about the benefits of feeding your dog dandelions and to get a few feeding ideas.

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The Benefits of Feeding Your Dog Dandelions

There are many good reasons to include dandelions in your dog’s diet, just as you should include them in your own diet. Dandelions are a rich source of minerals and have been proven to perform as an effective diuretic for both humans and dogs. They are full of A, C, K, and D vitamins, and they contain the entire B-complex of nutrients that are vital for the good health of your pooch, no matter their breed.

Dandelions are an almost perfect whole food source that shouldn’t be overlooked for humans, dogs, and other animals, such as cats! The flowers of the dandelion can be used to help improve your dog’s immune system. The leaves can also help ease digestion problems, especially as your pooch ages.

Dandelions are thought to be a liver tonic and will help the liver excrete bile for proper digestion, as well as heal the damage from years of filtering toxins through the body. When eaten as whole leaves, dandelions can even help naturally clean plaque from your dog’s teeth and promote optimal dental health.

The bottom line is that dandelions are an excellent addition to your dog’s diet, and there are many reasons to seek these greens out so they can be a regular staple in your kitchen. Don’t forget about the benefits of eating dandelions yourself. Those things you call weeds in the yard could help heal and strengthen your body, as well as that of your dog’s when used as supplementation.

black dogs in a dandelion field
Image credit: CosmoShiva, Pixabay

Dandelion Recipe Ideas That Your Dog Is Sure to Love

While dandelions can’t be the main food source for your family or your dog, it can be used as a nutritional supplement, just like the supplement pills on the store shelves. The difference is that you will be giving your family and dog whole food nutrition that is packed full of nutrients and is easily absorbable.

You can easily add dandelions to your salads, burgers, plates of pasta, and smoothies to gain their nutritional benefits. But what’s the best way to supplement your dog’s diet so they can reap the rewards from this so-called weed? There are actually a wide variety of preparation and feeding options to choose from. It’s best to experiment until you figure out how your dog best likes to be fed dandelions. Here are a couple of recipe ideas to consider.

Dandelions
Image credit: Ajale, Pixabay
  • Dandelion Beet Balls: We now know the benefits of dandelions, but did you know that beets are awesome for dogs too? You can make treats at home using dandelions and beets that will beat out the commercial competition and help your dog live their happiest and healthiest life.

Blend a handful of dandelion greens and a couple of peeled, steamed beets in a food processor. Add a tablespoon each of flaxseed and nutritional yeast for extra nutrition, and blend until mushy and well combined. Then add a ¼ cup of dry oats to the concoction, and blend one more time to incorporate the oats into the mixture.

Grab a handful of the mixture, and roll it into a small ball, then place it on a baking sheet. Complete this process until your baking sheet is full or until all your dough mixture has been used. Bake the balls in your oven that is warmed to 350°F for about 15 minutes, then let them cool before offering them to your pooch.

  • Dandelion and Turmeric Stew: Like many humans, dogs can’t resist stew. So, why not brew one up for your pooch that will deliver a powerhouse of nutrition? You can add the stew to your dog’s food and offer it as a high-class snack between meals. Your dog is sure to love the taste of real meat combined with nutritious sweet potatoes, carrots, and spices like turmeric.

Turmeric is a powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant that will help keep your pooch’s immune system in good shape in the coming years. To make a dandelion turmeric stew for your pooch, start by cooking a pound of ground beef or pork with the help of a little olive or coconut oil in a pot.

Once cooked, add 2 cups of broth, a handful of chopped dandelion greens and stems, a grated carrot, a chopped sweet potato, and a teaspoon of turmeric. Let the stew simmer on the stove for about an hour to make sure that all the flavors get fully combined and to draw the nutrients out of the food and into the broth.

What will be left is a thick, aromatic, and healthy stew that your pooch is sure to love, whether in place of a commercial meal or as a snack. In fact, this is something that your entire family can eat for enjoyment and health benefits!

White Dog Eating
Image credit: manushot, Shutterstock

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Our Final Thoughts

You can’t go wrong when it comes to feeding your family or your dog dandelions as a supplement to regular meals. The extra nutrition will support a healthy, active lifestyle for your pup, no matter their age. You don’t have to feed your dog dandelions every day to provide them with the nutritional rewards. An occasional sprinkling on food or an every-so-often snack should be enough to provide your pooch with a noticeable health boost. What do you think about feeding dandelions to dogs?


Featured Image Credit: art kitchen, Shutterstock