14 All-American Dog Breeds (With Pictures)

There are close to 200 recognized dog breeds from all over the world. Most come from popular places where humans settled through time like England, France, Germany, and China. But there are still quite a few from newer countries like America, and right now, we’re going to look at 14 breeds that began in the United States. Some breeds only received slight modifications in America, while others helped settlers in the early days and are uniquely American.

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American Dog Breeds

1. American Eskimo Dog

American Eskimo Dog
Image credit: Pxhere

You can get an American Eskimo Dog in standard, miniature, and toy sizes. It’s always white or white with a light cream color, and despite its name, Eskimos had nothing to do with the breed. It became popular as a member of Barnum & Bailey Circus, where it danced and put on a show.


2. American Foxhound

American Foxhound
Image credit: Olga Aniven, Shutterstock

American Fox Hounds are low maintenance dogs known for their speed and work ethic. George Washington played an important part in the origin of the breed, and today is the state dog of Virginia. The American Kennel Club recognized it as a unique breed in 1886.


3. American Water Spaniel

American Water Spaniel
Image credit: Steve Bruckmann, Shutterstock

The American Water Spaniel is from the American Midwest and is the first dog bred in the United States. They love to hunt and swim and are described as happy and eager to please. It’s been the state dog of Wisconsin since 1986.


4. American Staffordshire Terrier

American Staffordshire Terrier
Image credit: susanne906, pixabay

The American Staffordshire Terrier is known for being a good-natured, confidant, and smart dog breed. It’s a larger breed than the English Staffordshire Terrier. The American Kennel Club recognized it as a stand-alone breed in 1936.


5. Australian Shepherd

Australian Shepherd
Image credit: Asiabasia, Pixabay

The Australian Shepherd is known as the cowboy’s herd dog, and it still works as a herding dog in the American West. Despite its name, it was in fact created in America. This breed has also proven useful in helping the disabled and working with the police. It’s an extremely intelligent dog that likes to pull tricks on its owners to get what it wants. Their docked tails help them to avoid injury while they work.


6. Black and Tan Coonhound

Black and Tan Coonhound
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The Black and Tan Coonhound is a close relative of the Redbone Coonhound. It’s a very laid back Most of the time, but when engaged on a hunt, it can be tireless and tenacious. It was an extremely important breed while settling America’s West. They hunt raccoons, which were a main source of food for early settlers. It can also hunt deer, mountain lions, and bear.


7. Boston Terrier

Boston Terrier
Image credit: skeeze, Pixabay

The Boston Terrier is a small dog that’s instantly recognizable by its tuxedo coat and large round eyes. It’s a well-mannered dog that sometimes called “The American Gentleman.” It has a compact body with a short tail. It weighs less than twenty-five pounds and is well suited to city life and small apartments. The American Kennel Club accepted the Boston Terrier as a unique breed in 1893.


8. Catahoula Leopard Dog

Catahoula Leopard Dog
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The Catahoula Leopard Dog Is a medium to large breed with short hair it is believed to have originated in the state of Louisiana. It’s a great all-around dog, but it can be stubborn as well. It’s been the state dog of Louisiana since 1979, and the American Kennel Club accepted it in 2010.


9. Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Image credit: Kerrie T, Shutterstock

Chesapeake Bay Retrievers are strong gun dogs that can weigh up to 80 pounds. They have a mind of their own and can be stubborn when pursuing their own interests, but they are also protective, friendly, and gentle. It can withstand the cold waters of the Chesapeake Bay, and some reports claim it can retrieve up to 300 ducks in a single day due to its tireless work ethic.


10. Chinook

Chinook
Image credit: Pikrepo

The Chinook is a hauling dog bred for the strength of a hauler and the speed of a sled dog. It’s a calm dog that enjoys the company of children. It became popular as a sled dog, but the Siberian Husky soon took over as the top sled dog. The American Kennel Club recognized the Chinook as a unique breed in 2013 after a slow return from near extinction.


11. American Cocker Spaniel

american cocker spaniel
Image credit: lkoimages, Shutterstock

The American Cocker Spaniel is a small dog that’s extremely happy and playful. It’s the smallest of the sporting Spaniels, and it has a strong body with large floppy ears. It’s easily trained and makes perfect companions for children. They require a little extra grooming due to their long fur, but they will stand out in a crowd and turn heads. The American Cocker Spaniel is shorter than the English version and has longer fur. In the 1950s, the Cocker Spaniel was named the most popular dog of the decade.


12. Plott Hound

Plott Hound
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The Plott Hound is mellow at home, but fierce and tireless when on the hunt. It’s light-footed with medium length floppy ears. It stands about 25 inches tall and has a long tail. It started in North Carolina as a mountain dog meant for hunting bear and wild boar, and it gets its strange name from the man who created it, Johannes Plott.


13. Rat Terrier

Rat Terrier
Image credit: Shane N. Cotee, Shutterstock

The Rat Terrier is a small friendly dog. It’s compact and tough, standing only 10 to 13 inches tall at the shoulder. Its name is said to have been given by President Teddy Roosevelt. The American Kennel Club accepted the Rat Terrier as a unique breed in 2006.


14. Toy Fox Terrier

Toy Fox Terrier
Image credit: everydoghasastory, Shutterstock

The Toy Fox Terrier is a small dog with large, erect ears, and dark brown, round eyes. It’s a joker and will not let its small size prevent it from getting your full attention. It began as a barn rider quickly moved into show business due to its large personality and ability to learn tricks quickly. The American Kennel Club recognized it as a unique breed in 2003.

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Conclusion

We hope you have enjoyed reading over this list of American dogs and found something you’ve never heard of before. Some breeds like the Black and Tan Coonhound were critical to the survival of early settlers as they often brought the only food. Other kinds like the Chesapeake Bay Retriever took advantage of a situation and perhaps allowed hunters to be a little greedy. However, these breeds still make perfect modern-day companions and family members.


Featured Image Credit: OpenRangeStock, Shutterstock