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How Much Does a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Cost? (2021 Price Guide)

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is an energetic, family-friendly dog that gets along famously with young children and other household pets. They were originally bred as working dogs in Ireland, where they assisted farmers by guarding livestock, rooting out pests, and herding. Today, Wheatens are popular pets because they’re agreeable, playful, and intelligent.

Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers make excellent additions to active families that like spending time outside and can provide one to two hours of mental and physical exercise per day. If that sounds like a match for you and you’re considering getting a Wheaten, this guide will help you assess the costs of getting one. We cover both upfront costs and recurring costs and break them down into easily digestible monthly figures.

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Bringing Home a New Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier: One-Time Costs

Getting a puppy is a big decision. You need to make sure your house is puppy-proof,  purchase food, toys, and possibly a crate, and have enough money set aside to cover the cost of a breeder and vet visits. Many people are mentally prepared to become puppy parents but don’t have a solid grasp of the financial burden of taking care of one.

We’ll break down the one-time costs of getting a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier in the following few sections.

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
Image credit: Vadim Petrakov, Shutterstock

Free

If money is tight, adopting is the way to go. Rescuing a dog can be free if you look for special adoption events that waive the usual fee. Ask local vets and pet stores if they have any information about free adoption services and check Facebook groups for upcoming events. Be prepared to travel since often such events are regional and won’t make it to smaller locations.

Adoption

  • $50–$300

Adopting a dog outside of a particular event is still a good option for people looking to save money. Shelters are often overfilled and ill-equipped to look after all the animals under their care. Adoption fees are significantly smaller than the cost of buying a puppy from a breeder, and you help give an abandoned dog a home by choosing to rescue. It’s a win-win-win for you, the dog, and the shelter.

Depending on where you live and how high the demand is for adopting, the fees could range from $50 to $300. If you adopt a dog from out-of-state and require transportation, be prepared to pay closer to the high end.

Breeder

  • $900–$1,400

Buying a dog from a reputable breeder is the most expensive option but comes with some significant advantages over adopting. First, you are guaranteed to get a dog once you make a reservation and put down a deposit. Adoption is often a game of chance since puppies are adopted quickly, and you need to get lucky to find the kind of dog you’re looking for.

Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers are average-priced dogs and will run you about $1,100. Make sure to perform an extensive background check on a potential breeder before committing to buy a dog from them. Canine health records and genealogy are public information, so be wary of any breeder that doesn’t provide information about their breeding dogs as they may be hiding genetic disorders.

Initial Setup and Supplies

  • $200–$600

Whether you buy or adopt a Wheaten, you’ll have to stock up on supplies before you bring your fuzzy friend home. Every Wheaten requires a tag, food, toys, bowls, and a brush — that you’ll use a lot — and you might want to purchase a crate. Wheatens are social dogs but still need their own space and typically do well with crate training.

Make sure you split your toy budget between fun toys like balls and chew toys and mental toys like puzzle feeders. Wheatens are intelligent dogs and need mental stimulation to be fulfilled.

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List of Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Care Supplies and Costs

ID Tag $10
Spay/Neuter $145
Collar $20
Leash $10
Microchip $45-$55
Teeth Cleaning $150-$300
Crate $55
Nail Clipper (optional) $15
Brush $15
Bed $40
Training Pee Pads $25
Toys $60
Cleaning Supplies $10
Food and Water Bowls $15

How Much Does a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Cost Per Month?

  • $80–$300 per month

Once you have the initial costs covered, you can expect to pay between $80 and $300 per month, depending on how many toys need to be replaced and how often you take your dog to the groomer. Recurring costs like food and insurance won’t change much monthly, but other costs like vet visits and new toys are more difficult to predict and will fluctuate.

Wheatens are mid-sized dogs, meaning they eat an average amount of food and typically have reasonable monthly costs. Vet visits for medium-sized dogs like the Wheaten aren’t overly expensive, and groomers don’t charge extra since they don’t require any special equipment to accommodate a Wheaten.

Health Care

  • $100–$250 per month

The bulk of the health care costs of owning a Wheaten come from insurance, medications, grooming, and food. This estimate for monthly health care costs doesn’t include one-time medical costs resulting from injuries or illnesses, so keep that in mind. Wheatens are generally healthy dogs but do suffer from some genetic diseases that require treatment.

Food

  • $15–$50 per month

The price of dog food varies quite a lot between brands, so your monthly cost for food could be as little as $15 or as much as $50. We recommend consulting a veterinarian or veterinary nutritionist before choosing what brand and style of dog food to buy for your Wheaten. They will be able to tailor your dog’s diet to meet their specific needs.

Don’t cut corners and try to save money on food. Choosing a more expensive but higher quality food can help your dog live a healthier, happier life and ultimately save you money on vet visits. There are other areas better suited to cutting corners besides food.

Grooming

  • $30–$80 per month

Soft Coated Wheatens have medium-length, wavy coats prone to matting if they’re not properly maintained. We recommend at least six yearly visits to a professional groomer to keep their coats healthy and mat-free. Groomers can be expensive but are usually worth the price since they’ll do a better job than untrained owners. How often you take your dog to the groomer is up to you and will skew your monthly cost accordingly.

Medications and Vet Visits

  • $30–$60 per month

Medications like heartworm and flea and tick prevention are essential for keeping your dog healthy and don’t cost much money. Healthy dogs should also go to the vet for yearly checkups to ensure they remain healthy and in good condition. Catching illnesses early is vital for giving them the best prognosis, so don’t avoid an annual vet trip to save money.

Impromptu trips to the vet for injuries or emergencies will inevitably crop up throughout your dog’s life, but it is difficult to quantify the monthly price of such visits since they will be infrequent and random. We recommend setting aside some money in an emergency fund to help offset surprise health-related costs.

Pet Insurance

  • $10–$50 per month

Insurance is one of those things that feel like a waste of money until you need it. Pet insurance is inexpensive and can save you tons of money if your dog gets sick or hurt. Basic pet insurance plans cover accidents like swallowing things or breaking a bone, and more comprehensive plans also cover illnesses.

We recommend pet insurance to every dog owner because it offers peace of mind at worst and can help you avoid making difficult decisions if your buddy gets sick by lessening the financial burden.

Environment Maintenance

  • $5–$10 per month

Wheatens aren’t destructive dogs and aren’t known for chewing furniture or damaging household items. As long as you keep them mentally and physically stimulated by lots of organized playtime and exercise, you shouldn’t have many maintenance-related costs.

However, unstimulated Wheatens will fall back their Terrier tendencies and could dig inside if they’re left unattended. Puzzle toys and plenty of outside time are the best antidotes to stop indoor digging.

The only regular maintenance costs come from replenishing your supply of paper towels and cleaning spray.

Entertainment

  • $10–$40 per month

Wheatens are active dogs that love being outside. They don’t need tons of toys, a simple ball to chase and a rope to tug is enough, so this is one area you can look to save money in.

If you have some extra cash and want to spend it on toys, we recommend opting for mentally stimulating toys like puzzle balls and food mazes, but agility equipment is also a great option. Even though Wheatens aren’t typically known for agility, training them in a few obstacles is a great way to combine physical and mental stimulation and simultaneously deepen your relationship.

You could also consider subscribing to a monthly toy crate if you want regular deliveries of fun items your pooch will love.

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Total Monthly Cost of Owning a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

  • $100–$400 per month

Altogether you can expect to pay between $100 and $400 per month to feed, entertain, and care for your Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier. If you have extra money to spend on your new best friend, we strongly encourage you to put it towards the entertainment budget.

Dogs that receive enough physical and mental stimulation are happier, less destructive, and healthier, which — besides giving them a better life — also means fewer extraneous costs for you.

Additional Costs to Factor In

Besides the costs we’ve already covered, there are a few one-time costs that could be relevant for you, depending on your lifestyle. If you like to travel, make sure to account for the price of boarding your dog or hiring a sitter while you’re away.

Emergency vet visits are impossible to predict but are bound to come up, so make sure you have a small emergency fund available in case you need it.

Owning a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier On a Budget

Owning a dog on a tight budget can be trying, but there are a few ways to save money. Toys can be homemade, and a leash is all you need to take your buddy on long walks for exercise.

We don’t recommend cutting costs on vet visits, food, and insurance. Even though it’s tempting to go without insurance if you need to get your dog medical care, the costs will be higher than the cumulative insurance cost.

Wheatens need regular grooming to avoid matting, so we also don’t recommend forgoing professional grooming unless you can do it yourself. If money is very tight, you can get away with four professional grooming sessions per year as long as you supplement them by trimming and washing your Wheaten yourself between sessions.

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Conclusion

Getting a new puppy is exciting! If you’re considering getting a Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier to be the newest, fuzziest member of your family, expect to pay between $1,500 and $3,000 for the first year and between $750 and $2,000 per year thereafter.

Toys and entertainment-related costs are the best places to spend more money if you have it or cut costs if money is tight. Dogs aren’t picky, and, with some creativity, you can keep them entertained with homemade toys and games. Don’t try to save money by buying cheaper food, avoiding vet visits, or forgoing insurance, since these are essential for your dog’s health.

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Featured Image Credit: furry_portraits, Pixabay