The Shiffon: A Complete Guide

With so many dog breeds out there, it can be hard to find the perfect one. There is also a lot of pressure since you have to stick with that puppy for a long time, making no room for regret.

There is a dog breed that can fit into anyone’s life, and that dog is the Shiffon.

The Shiffon is a dog that is mixed with the Shih Tzu and the Brussels Griffon. They are small dogs that love to play and cuddle with their owner.

They adapt well to any living situation and is a great dog to have whether you are young or old. If you think you might be interested in these little pups, you have come to the right place.

This guide will be about all the information that you need to learn about the Shiffon.

Everything that you need to know to make a decision, such as their appearance, personality, intelligence, diet and more will be discussed in detail so you can decide if this pup would be an excellent addition to your life.

Read on to learn.

Shiffon Puppies – Before You Buy…

The Shiffons are small dogs that love to cuddle with their owners.

Before you set out on your journey of buying a puppy, you should make sure that you are one hundred percent ready to have a puppy to your life.

Having a dog is a huge commitment and should not be taken lightly.

It is essential to learn everything you can about this dog breed before deciding to get one, and the first thing to concern yourself with is the price.

What Price are Shiffon Puppies?

The price of your puppy can vary quite a bit due to certain factors, such as the demand in your area and the state that the puppy is in.

If you live in an area where the Shiffon is in high demand, the price can be as high as $750. The usual price range for these pups is $100 to $800.

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Other things that affect the price of a Shiffon is the age that you buy them, where/who you buy one from, and the gender and health state of the puppy.

The girls in a litter can be priced higher than males if the breeder decides to, especially if the puppy is not spayed since it has the potential to reproduce.

The health of the puppy is also important since this will let you know if you have to take extra care of them and will tell you how often they will have to go to the vet and this can be pricey.

The person that you buy a Shiffon from is the most crucial step of the process of getting a dog.

How to Find Reputable Shiffon Breeders?

The best way to find a breeder that you can trust is by looking online or in your local newspaper to see if there are any in your area for the Shiffon.

If not, you may have to be prepared to go out of your way to get to where the puppy is or to handle the expenses that are needed to transport the puppy to you.

The key things to look out for when you are choosing a breeder to buy from is to visit the home of the puppy and see how they are treated.

If you notice that any of the puppies are malnourished or the parent of the puppy has some health conditions and behavior problems, it is safe to assume that the puppy you are interested in has been mistreated in some way and that they will grow up to be like their parents.

3 Little-Known Facts about Shiffon Puppies

  1. One of the parent breeds that make up the Shiffon, the Shih Tzu, was almost equivalent to royalty in ancient China. They were treasured so much by the early Chinese that they didn’t want to sell them outside of the country.
  2. The Brussels Griffon was also royal since they were the pet of Belgium’s queen during that time, who was Marie Henriette. She began breeding them, and because they were growing in popularity, they were transported to England and then the United States. They almost became extinct because of World War II, and because of this, they are a rare dog breed. They gained their popularity back by being in movies.
  3. The Shiffon itself has unknown origins and no record of when it was first created or where like many crossbreeds. This is why looking at the breeds that make up the Shiffon is important to understand them better.
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Physical Traits of the Shiffon

The Shiffon needs only a cup of food a day.

The Shiffon is a small dog, which is no surprise since it comes from two small dog breeds.

The Shih Tzu and the Brussels Griffon have coats that are very different from each other.

The Shiffon can either take after the Shih Tzu and have long, flowy and silky hair, or have a coat that is short and wiry like the Brussels Griffon.

They don’t come in many colors.

In fact, they are only black and brown, and some dogs from this breed can have white markings on their fur or be a combination of black and brown.

All dogs from this breed have dark brown eyes and a black nose, and a tail that curls on their back or long like that of the Brussels Griffon.

How Big is a Full-Grown Shiffon?

The Shiffon can be 8 to 11 inches tall and weigh between 8 and 15 pounds. Males of this breed are significantly bigger than females.

Since these are small dogs, they are great for those of you that live in apartment and condos since they don’t need a lot of space to play around.

The Brussels Griffon and the Shih Tzu are similar in size, so there won’t be any surprises concerning the outcome of their size.

What is the Life Expectancy of the Shiffon?

The Shiffon has the average lifespan of most small to medium dog breeds, which is 12 to 15 years.

If they don’t develop any of the health risks that their breed is prone to getting and get the right nutrients and exercise throughout their life, they can live past the amount that the majority do, so keep this in mind as you are raising your dog.

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Intelligence, Temperament, and Personality Traits of the Shiffon

The Shiffons are only black and brown.

The Shiffon is a very cheerful and happy dog, and their personality is the type to make you put a smile on your face even when you don’t want to.

They love spending as much time with their family as they can, no matter if it’s going on walks or cuddling with you as you watch tv.

Even though they love to be around their loved ones, they do not get separation anxiety, so they are well suited for those of you that have to work long hours every day or just have to be out of the house in general.

If you have other pets in your home, your Shiffon may try to become the ringleader, which may lead to complications with the other dogs in the household.

Because of this, always watch any interactions and playtime with the dogs to make sure that no fighting occurs.

One other thing about this dog that may be a concern is that they are known to become attached to one family member in the house.

They will still love everyone they are around, but can become jealous by other members of the family getting attention from their “favorite.”

This may be a concern if you have a baby, so keep this in mind when deciding.

The Shiffon’s Diet

The Shiffon only needs one cup of food a day to stay energetic, healthy, and happy.

It is recommended that you buy high-quality food for this dog to ensure that they get all the nutrients they need to thrive.

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How Much Exercise Does a Shiffon Need?

This little pup is full of energy and will love to play with you and your loved ones all the time. They are not overly active, so this is perfect for those of you that do not lead super active lifestyles.

They enjoy short walks around the neighborhood or to your nearest dog park where they can play with other dogs as long as they are socialized thoroughly.

You may want to do this to only a few times a day, and long walks for these pups are not recommended, especially those with the muzzle and nose of the Shih Tzu.

It is called the brachycephalic snout that limits their breathing, so make sure that you don’t push them too far when it comes to exercising them.

Shiffon Health and Conditions

The Shiffon is a relatively healthy dog breed with only a few health risks to watch out for.

Serious Issues:

  • Patellar Luxation
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Cataracts

Minor Issues:

What are the best types of toys?

This is a truly playful pooch, and has energy to spare – so any kinds of toys you want to throw your Shiffon dog’s way are always going to be well appreciated.

Of course, massive chew toys and tug of war ropes designed for bigger and more brutal breeds aren’t really a good fit for this dog.

Likewise, balls even bigger than the dog themselves are only an invitation for more harm than good.

Smaller balls for playing fetch are always hugely appreciated by this breed though, and that classic day at the park throwing it for your Shiffon to retrieve never goes out of style.

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You can also get smaller frisbees that your dog can more easily catch and carry back to you, too.

As an affectionate little dog, you can also buy your Shiffon a companion toy, or a plush animal, for them to huddle up with when they want some love but you’re a little busy.

Special toys of this kind as designed for dogs are far more resilient than normal children’s toys, so you won’t come home one day to find an overexcited dog has scattered stuffing around your living room.

However, owing to the intelligence of the Shiffon breed and their natural curiosity, puzzle games and toys that have hidden features, secret compartments or problems to solve also work well.

Mental toys for dogs are proving more and more popular with lots of breeds, this one included.

My Final Thoughts on the Shiffon

The Shiffon is a great dog breed for those of you that know how to care for a dog already and has had experience.

If you are a first-time dog owner, the Shiffon may be a bit challenging for you, but not impossible to deal with.

Plus, once they are well trained, you will have a delightful time with them.

I hope this guide has aided you in deciding whether or not the Shiffon is right for you.

Image Sources: 1, 2, 3

OVERALL SUMMARY

6
Cost to Buy
7.5
Cuteness Level
8.5
Family Safety
8.5
Friendliness
9
Health Concerns
7.5
Life Span
8
Exercise Required
10
Food Required
OVERALL RATING 8.1 / 10

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