19 Mastiff Mixed Breeds

According to the American Kennel Club, the Mastiff is one of the top 30 most popular dogs in the US, probably because they are loyal, courageous, and friendly. Mastiffs are a giant breed that will scare away intruders without making a sound, and their line runs back to the beginning of civilization. It’s no wonder that so many mixed breeds use the Mastiff as one of the parents.

We’ve searched the internet to see just how many different breeds we could find that use the Mastiff as one of the parents, and we are going to present that list to you here.

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List of Mastiff Mixed Breeds

1. American Bandogge (Mastiff x American Bulldog or Pitbull)

Bandog
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The word Bandogge is a term that is a term that describes several dog breeds that are very similar, so the American Bandogge breed does not always have the same parents. It is most often a Mastiff and an American Bulldog or a Mastiff and an American Pitbull. This breed has a body shape that resembles an American Bulldog or American Pitbull.


2. American Masti-Bull (Mastiff x American Bulldog)

The American Masti-Bull is a mixed breed like the American Bandogge, but it removes the vagueness of the parents and limits it to a Mastiff and American Bulldog. This breed is a heavily muscled large dog, shaped like the Bulldog and slightly shorter than the Mastiff. It’s friendly, but it can be challenging to train.


3. Amstiff (Mastiff x American Staffordshire Terrier)

The Amstiff is a protective breed that can weigh up to 250 pounds. It’s a mix between the Mastiff and the Staffordshire Terrier, which is known for its intelligence and friendly nature. The Amstiff is easy to train and can live in an apartment if you take it for long walks.


4. Mountain Mastiff (Mastiff x Burmese Mountain Dog)

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The Mountain Mastiff is a mix between the Mastiff and the Burmese Mountain Dog. It’s a large dog that can weigh up to 200 pounds and is a skilled work dog that can track as well as pull weight. They are friendly and love to be part of a family.


5. Boxmas (Mastiff x Boxer)

The Boxmas is a mix of the Mastiff and the Boxer. It’s a tall standing dog with short, waterproof hair and ears that resemble the Mastiff. It tends to become attached to a single person if not properly socialized at an early age. It also tends to shed and is not suitable for people with strong allergies.


6. Doubull Mastiff (Mastiff x Bullmastiff)

The Doubull Mastiff is a giant breed created from mixing the Mastiff with a Bullmastiff. It’s known as a gentle giant that can weigh up to 200 pounds. It has a straight coat that doesn’t shed much and only requires weekly brushing. They are a little challenging to train due to their stubbornness and also tend to be lazy, and getting them to go far walks can be a struggle.


7. Mastapeake (Mastiff x Chesapeake Bay Retriever)

The Mastapeake is a large and extremely active dog created by mixing the Mastiff with a Chesapeake Bay Retriever. They are cautious of strangers and often chase small animals that enter the yard. Early socialization is required to house them with other pets. They have large heads, and their coat is usually one solid color.


8. Muscle Mastiff (Mastiff x Dogue de Bordeaux)

The Muscle Mastiff has a broad, muscular body that is a mix of the Mastiff and the Dogue de Bordeaux. It has droopy jowls and ears, and you can find them in many colors. It’s a loyal dog that is very gentle but requires a moderate amount of grooming.


9. French Masti-Bull (Mastiff x French Bulldog)

The French Masti-Bull is a mixed breed created by mixing the Mastiff with a French Bulldog. These are stubborn and lazy dogs that tend to grunt and snore. However, they don’t require much activity and are low maintenance. They are also great with children and make great watchdogs.


10. Mastiff Shepphard (Mastiff x German Shepherd)

The Mastiff Shepherd is a mix of the Mastiff and the German Shepherd. It’s an unusual breed where the puppies prefer to sleep than play. They can also be difficult to train due to their stubborn nature. The Mastiff Shepphard is a large dog that doesn’t shed much, likes to work hard, and is very protective of its family.


11. Daniff (Mastiff x Great Dane)

The Daniff is a large mixed breed created by mixing the Mastiff with a Great Dane. This breed is very gentle and loves being part of the family. Their large size will require a lot of space, and this breed is best suited to a house with a large yard. They drool a lot but don’t require much grooming.


12. Maspyr (Mastiff x Great Pyrenees)

The Maspyr breed is a large to giant size dog created by mixing a Mastiff with the Great Pyrenees. This dog is a great protector as well as a great companion, but it requires an owner experienced with large dogs. The coats are usually light-colored, and its tail hangs lower than its body but curls upward.


13. Irish Mastiff (Mastiff x Irish Wolfhound)

The Irish Mastiff is a breed created by mixing the Mastiff with the Irish Wolfhound. It is one of the largest dog breeds, reaching up to three feet tall and weighing more than 150 pounds. It’s an easygoing animal that’s very laid back and likes to be part of a family. The Irish Mastiff is surprisingly adaptable to small apartments, but it prefers large homes with a big yard.


14. Mastador (Mastiff x Labrador Retriever)

The Mastador is a mix between the Mastiff and the Labrador Retriever. It’s a working dog that likes to participate in rescues, drug detection, hunting, guarding, and many other activities. It’s good with children and other pets and only requires a moderate amount of grooming. It is an energetic breed that will need plenty of room to run around, so it’s not a great apartment dog.


15. English Mastahoula (Mastiff x Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog)

The English Mastahoula is created by mixing a Mastiff with a Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog. You can describe this breed best as an easygoing watchdog. It originated in the southern United States for hunting and herding livestock. These are very stubborn animals that require an experienced owner but are very intelligent and capable of performing a wide range of jobs and tasks.


16. Englian Mastiff (Mastiff x Neapolitan Mastiff)

The Englian Mastiff is a mixed breed created by mixing the Mastiff with the Neapolitan Mastiff. This dog is lazy but extremely well behaved. It makes a great companion, and it loves playing with children.


17. Mastidoodle (Mastiff x Poodle)

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The Mastidoodle is a large fuzzy dog created by mixing the Mastiff with a Poodle. This breed is very docile and perfect for children due to its curly coat. They usually stand about 2 ½-feet tall and often weigh more than 120 pounds. If you leave the Mastidoodle alone too long, it can get into mischief.


18. English Mastweiler (Mastiff x Rottweiler)

The English Mastweiler is a mix of Mastiff and Rottweiler. It was designed specifically for the protection of property and person and can be dangerous to have around small animals and children without proper supervision. They will require regular grooming and moderate exercise.


19. Saint Bermastiff (Mastiff x Saint Bernard mix)

The Saint Bermastiff is a large dog capable of reaching over 200 pounds. Saint Bermastiff is one of the largest designer dog breeds, and it has quite a unique temperament. It’s always friendly, but it can go from lazy to being active without notice, and they are well known for trying to sit on your lap.

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We hope that you have enjoyed this in-depth look at the many different mixed breeds created by mixing the legendary Mastiff with any number of other dog breeds. The Saint Bermastiff and the Irish Mastiff are probably the largest, but every dog on this list is large and can easily reach 150 or more pounds. Some breeds may be good for beginners, but on average, an experienced owner will have a better time dealing with the large size of these animals.


Featured Image: Michal Ninger, Shutterstock