Long Haired German Shepherd

Height: 22 – 26 inches
Weight: 50 – 90 pounds
Lifespan: 7 – 10 years
Colors: Black and Tan, Black and Red, Black, Black and Silver, Sable
Suitable for: Active families or Individuals, Able to spend lots of time at home
Temperament: Devoted, Athletic, Calm, Easygoing, Protective, Intelligent, Confident

The Long Haired German Shepherd (also called the Long Coat) is essentially a German Shepherd with, well, long hair. There are a few differences in personality and temperament in addition to the coat, so we’ll explore these contrasts in more detail for you in this article. The German Shepherd (also called the GSD) originated in Germany in the late 1800s and was bred to be the ideal herding dog.

The standard GSD is the second most popular dog out of 196 breeds in the USA, according to the American Kennel Club (AKC). The Long Haired German Shepherd has the same build, height, and weight and has the same colors and markings as the standard GSD but has a double coat with a longer outer coat (the Short Haired GSD has shorter fur and also a double coat).

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Long Haired German Shepherd Puppies – Before You Buy…

long haired german shepherd puppy
Image Credit: CC0 Public Domain, Pxhere
Energy
Trainability
Health
Lifespan
Sociability

The Long Haired German Shepherd is an energetic dog with an average lifespan and is generally a little healthier than its standard GSD counterpart. Their intelligence and devoted nature make them highly trainable, and they tend to be a little friendlier and social as compared to the Short Haired GSD.

What’s the Price of Long Haired German Shepherd Puppies?

The Long Haired is rarer than the standard GSD, so expect to pay a little more for a puppy. The average price could range from $1,500 to $4,000 for a puppy from a good breeder. It’s essential to find a responsible and reputable breeder as you will want to avoid puppy mills at all costs.

Here are a few pointers to help you to determine if you’re dealing with a reputable breeder:

  • Meet with the breeder in person: Make an appointment with the breeder so you can have a look at the kennels and the dogs. Are the dogs in good condition and have a strong relationship with the breeder? Are the dog’s living spaces clean and well kept? If you can’t meet with the breeder in person, use video chat.
  • Meet the parents: You should have a look at your prospective puppy’s parents. This will not only give you a look at their health, temperament, and appearance, but it should also give you an idea about how your puppy will turn out as an adult dog.
  • Ask for the medical history: A good breeder will willingly provide you with their dog’s medical history with no questions asked. They should have had all of their dogs screened for serious health conditions and will be open with the results.
  • Ask loads of questions: You should askas many questions that you feel are necessary. A good breeder will not only openly and honestly answer your questions but will welcome them. Never worry if you think your questions sound dumb; there’s no such thing as a stupid question.

You also need to think about the expense of raising a puppy and caring for a dog throughout his life.

Some of the day-to-day upkeep of a puppy usually includes:

  • Puppy training pads
  • Dog/puppy food
  • Food and water dishes
  • Grooming equipment
  • Toys for chewing and playing
  • Puppy/dog treats
  • Crate and bedding
  • Harness, leash, and collar

Additional expenses that typically occur are:

  • Spaying or neutering
  • Microchipping
  • Veterinarian appointments
  • Grooming if needed
  • Obedience classes
  • Vaccinations

You could also think about adopting a Long Haired German Shepherd as you’ll be saving a dog and providing him with a second chance at a better life. The price of adopting a dog could range from $300 to $600, but if you decide to take a senior or special needs dog home with you, some rescue groups will waive or lower the adoption fee.

long haired german shepherd dog
Image Credit: Kamracik, Pixabay

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3 Little-Known Facts About the Long Haired German Shepherd

1. The long hair comes from a recessive gene

The Long Haired German Shepherd has developed through a recessive gene that needs to be present in both parents (meaning that both parents must be carriers of this gene or both must be Long Haired German Shepherds as well).

2. The Long Haired German Shepherd isn’t recognized

The American Kennel Club acknowledges but does not recognize the long hair variety of German Shepherd. The long hair is considered a fault, but these dogs are acknowledged by the Kennel Club of the UK as well as the FCI.

3. The Long Haired GSD has an undercoat

There is a common belief that the Long Haired German Shepherd does not have an undercoat, but this is not true. Their undercoat is not as thick or as long as their topcoat, but they are a double-coated breed.

long-haired german shepherd
Image Credit: haidi2002, Pixabay

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Temperament & Intelligence of the Long Haired German Shepherd

The Long Haired German Shepherd is similar to its Short Haired GSD counterpoint in temperament and intelligence. However, the Long Haired GSD is considered a little more laidback and easygoing in comparison.

They are just as intelligent as the Short Haired GSD and are protective of their owner but aren’t known to be as aggressive while in protection mode. They are also not as wary of strangers and are calmer and a little less energetic than the Short Haired GSD.

Are These Dogs Good for Families? 👪

The Long Haired German Shepherd is a fantastic dog for families! They are gentle and patient with children of all ages. Because the Long Haired GSD is a calmer version of the Short Haired, they will be the perfect dog for a family with children. Kids need to be taught to respect dogs and should always be supervised when around your dog, particularly younger children. The GSD has a strong loyalty to his family and is a courageous dog, so he will also make a wonderful guardian to watch over the entire family.

Does This Breed Get Along with Other Pets?

Again, because the Long Haired GSD is a more easygoing version of the Short Haired GSD, he is a little more likely to get along well with other pets. As long as they are socialized well when puppies, they typically should have no trouble with other animals.

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Things to Know When Owning a Long Haired German Shepherd:

Food & Diet Requirements 🦴

The Long Haired GSD is an active and large dog that will need high-quality dry dog food. Once you decide upon the kind of food you want to feed your dog, you can follow the instructions provided on the food bag to help you determine how much and how often you should feed your GSD. If you’re ever worried about your dog’s weight, always speak to your vet.

Exercise 🐕

The GSD is a very energetic and active dog and will need about 2 hours of exercise every day for his mental and physical health. He will do very well in agility, tracking, and herding trials, which will also keep him healthy and happy. A bored GSD makes a destructive GSD.

Training 🎾

The Long Haired German Shepherd will respond quite well to positive, reward-based training that is consistent and firm but gentle. He will do best spending time in the house with his family. Persistent training and a loving relationship with his family will give you a well-adjusted and happy dog.

long haired german shepherd
Image Credit: Kamracik, Pixabay

Grooming ✂️

The Long Haired German Shepherd does require a little more attention to his grooming than the Short Haired GSD. Because their undercoat isn’t as thick as the Short Haired GSD’s coat, they tend to shed a little less, but they will need regular brushing, particularly after a walk in the woods. Expect to brush him several times a week, but he may need to be brushed daily when he starts shedding in the spring and fall. Only give him a bath with a good dog shampoo (like this one) about once a month.

The ears of your Long Haired German Shepherd will need to be cleaned around once a month. His nails should be trimmed every 3 to 4 weeks, and his teeth brushed about 2 or 3 times a week.

Health and Conditions 🏥

The Long Haired GSD is prone to the same health conditions as the standard GSD.

If you purchased your puppy from a breeder, he should have been screened for these health conditions before he went home with you, but you will need to bring him to your veterinarian for regular checkups. Your vet will check your dog’s elbows and hips and will run urinalysis and blood tests.

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Male vs Female

The female Long Haired GSD is typically smaller than the male in size, with the male coming at 24 to 26 inches and weighing 65 to 90 pounds and the female at 22 to 24 inches and weighing 50 to 70 pounds.

Neutering the male dog is a less complex surgery than spaying the female dog, so expect to pay less and for him to have a shorter recovery time. Neutering or spaying your dog has the advantage of lessening any aggressive behavior, and it could contribute to a longer life for your dog as these surgeries are known to prevent future health problems.

The last major difference between male and female dogs is in temperament. Some believe that male dogs are less affectionate and a little harder to train than females, but there are debates around this. It can be said that the personality and temperament of any dog will truly be determined by how he was trained and socialized as a puppy and how he has been looked after throughout his lifetime.

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Final Thoughts:

While the Long Haired German Shepherd isn’t as common as the Short Haired, there are a number of breeders around the world that specialize in this particular breed. If you’re having any trouble locating one, start by speaking to breeders that may be far away, but they might know of someone closer to your location. You can also post messages on social media as a way of reaching a wider audience.

If you’re thinking of adopting a Long Haired GSD from a rescue group, there are a number of breed-specific groups that can be found all over the world. The Westside German Shepherd Rescue is based out of Los Angeles, California that saves all kinds of German Shepherds, even the occasional Long Haired breed.

The Long Haired German Shepherd is a beautiful dog that makes a steadfast and loyal companion dog for an individual or family. If you’re looking for a devoted, intelligent, and courageous dog that will turn heads with his gorgeous flowing coat, then consider adding the Long Haired German Shepherd to your household.


Featured Image: Free-Photos, Pixabay