Huskimo (Siberian Husky & American Eskimo Mix)

Height: 21-24 inches
Weight: 40-60 pounds
Lifespan: 12-15 years
Colors: White, red, gray, black, brown
Suitable for: Active families, those looking for a companion dog
Temperament: Loyal and loving, playful, intelligent, friendly

The Huskimo is a crossbreed between the Siberian Husky and the American Eskimo dog. The Siberian Husky has been used as a sled dog for generations by the Chukchi people of North-Eastern Siberia. Siberian Huskies have excellent tolerance to harsh, cold climates and can endure long periods of activity.

On the other hand, American Eskimo dogs hail from Germany and were originally known as German spitz dogs.  They are a Nordic breed and were brought to the United States by German settlers.

The Huskimo is a relatively new dog breed. The first individuals were bred in the 1990s. Nowadays, pups are born from Huskimo parents. The Huskimos are a designer dog breed, meaning they have been bred for specific traits. Tolerance to harsh climates, intelligence, and endurance are a few of the distinguishing features of this breed.

Huskimos are medium-sized, energetic, and loyal companions. New and inexperienced dog owners may have trouble training them because of their pack instinct. Owners must be firm and confident and clearly show that they are the pack leader. Otherwise, your pet might assume the role of top dog (pun intended).

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Huskimo Puppies — Before You Buy

Huskimo puppy with blue eyes
Image: JStaley401, Shutterstock

As mentioned above, Huskimo dogs have a strong pack instinct. This means they need a clear leader, and if you cannot be firm and confidently give orders, the dog will grow disobedient. If you cannot do this yourself, enroll them in puppy training classes and assert leadership in your free time.

The dogs have an inner and outer coat. The inner coat is soft and the outer is rough. This is called a double coat. The double coat allows dogs of the Huskimo breed to have an incredibly high tolerance to cold temperatures and good tolerance to hot temperatures. Be careful in hot climates, though, since these dogs have been known to develop heatstroke.

The Siberian Husky, one of the Huskimo’s ancestors, participates in Alaskan dog sled races that are hundreds of miles long. The Huskimo inherited some of these genes and thus scores high for energy.

The dogs require experienced handlers, but it isn’t hard to train them due to their intelligence. Consequently, their trainability score is respectable.

Being designer breeds, they have few health issues and are excellent companions. Huskimo dogs score highly for health, lifespan, and sociability.

Energy
Trainability
Health
Lifespan
Sociability

What’s the Price of Huskimo Puppies?

The price of good Huskimo pups varies with breeders. You should expect to fork out anywhere between $800 and $1,800. Puppies will be more expensive than older individuals, and often, females will be priced higher than male pups.

Make sure you buy from a good breeder, preferably one who has positive reviews from other customers. It is also important to visit the breeder personally. Check the conditions that the animals live in and take note of the smallest of details, such as how the puppies interact with the breeder. If they seem scared or exhibit some form of negative behavior, something might be wrong.

Be sure to check the parents’ immunization records and the puppy’s health records. Shopping for puppies is fun, but do not get sidetracked and forget to check vital details.

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3 Little-Known Facts About the Huskimo

1. Siberian Huskies, one of the Huskimo’s parent breeds, have been known to pull dog sleds over hundreds of miles.

2. The American Eskimo dog has nothing to do with Eskimos.

3. The Huskimo breed is relatively new, since it was first bred in the 1990s.

Parents of Huskimo
The parents of Huskimo. Left: Siberian Husky, Right: American Eskimo

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Temperament & Intelligence of the Huskimo

The Huskimo was bred from the Siberian Husky and the American Eskimo dog. Both of these breeds have an outstanding work ethic, intelligence, and loyalty. But these dogs should not be left on their own because like many other dog breeds, their intelligence gets devoted to rather sinister motives when they get bored.

Huskimos want to please their owner, but as mentioned, the owner must provide firm and confident leadership. In essence, the owner plays the role of pack leader. This breed is rarely aggressive.

But make sure to properly socialize and train dogs of the Huskimo breed at a young age, or they can get aggressive and antisocial.

Are These Dogs Good for Families? 👪

Their loyalty, playful nature, and intelligence make the Huskimo a perfect family pet. They are hyperactive, so the whole family will eventually get drafted to the job of exercising them.

Huskimos are good with children. However, make sure to properly socialize your animal and teach your children how to interact with the dog. This will go a long way in preventing scratching or biting or other forms of aggression.

Does This Breed Get Along With Other Pets?

It’s hard to predict what behaviors a crossbreed will exhibit, even with puppies from the same litter. If the Husky character is more dominant in your dog, they may see other smaller pets as prey and chase them. This is rare, though, and should not be a concern.

Huskimo puppy on log tongue out
Image: JStaley401, Shutterstock

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Things to Know When Owning a Huskimo

A Huskimo’s requirements aren’t much different from other dogs of their size. They should be fed approximately 3 cups of food daily, exercised for more than 90 minutes daily, and groomed regularly.

Food & Diet Requirements 🦴

Huskimos will eat more than other dogs of their size and have sometimes been known to steal food. As mentioned, the average amount of food that an adult Huskimo will eat is 3 cups. If you’re unsure what to feed your pet, ask the breeder.

Take note that Huskimos can easily get obese, so go easy on food if you notice them getting overweight.

Exercise 🐕

Having descended from Siberian Huskies and American Eskimos, Huskimos need exercise. They have near-boundless energy and will almost certainly not be worn down by physical activity alone. Mental stimulation should be part of the daily exercise routine, not only to wear down your dog but also to keep them busy.

As with many other highly intelligent dog breeds, Huskimos are most at peace when you give them a job to do. Puzzles and agility courses are good examples of exercises that will stimulate your dog both mentally and physically.

Training 🎾

You should train your dog when they are still a pup. This is probably old news, but not doing so could bring a whole host of challenges when the dog matures. Training plays a few roles, such as:

  • Asserting dominance over the dog
  • Curtailing negative behavior before the dog matures
  • Teaching the dog tricks or other things you’d like your pet to know

Training should be firm but not harsh. Being harsh toward Huskimos may cause them to develop fear, anxiety, and sometimes aggressive behavior.

Grooming ✂️

Huskimos have a reputation for being high maintenance and for good reason. Their coat needs brushing daily to keep it looking its best. Bathe them only when necessary, usually once every few months.

Their ears tend to accumulate ear wax, so clean them regularly. Brush their teeth often (dog toothpaste is readily available) to keep their gums strong, and trim their nails at least once a month. Keep in mind that the more active your dog is, the less you’ll need to trim their nails.

Health and Conditions 🏥

As mentioned above, Huskimos are designer dog breeds. This means they won’t frequently fall ill. However, these dogs have been known to suffer from serious conditions such as hip dysplasia and eye cataracts. They are also susceptible to skin infections.

Male vs. Female

Male and female Huskimos do not have any significant difference in size. The choice of gender is based almost purely on preference.

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Final Thoughts

Whether you live in a warm or extremely cold climate, Huskimos will have no trouble adapting. Their double coat will keep them safe from all but the most extreme climates. They are bigger than most dogs, and their agility and intelligence make them good companions.


Featured Image: JStaley401, Shutterstock