Goldendoodle: A Complete Guide

The Goldendoodle is relatively new breed, but it has taken the world by storm. These cute, fluffy, and friendly dogs are a great household animal for any family.

They are energetic, playful and they will give you unparalleled service if they are trained right.

This breed is a 50/50 mix between a Golden Retriever and the Traditional Poodle. They were created in the mid-90’s as a service dog.

Golden Retrievers have traditionally made excellent seeing-eye dogs for the blind or visually impaired, but their long hair has been known to cause allergies in certain people.

A seeing-eye dog isn’t going to be very helpful if you spend the whole time sneezing!

The Goldendoodle is a very friendly creature.

Poodles are much less prone to cause allergic reactions, so breeders figured that they could try to breed them with Golden Retrievers to get the ultimate service dog. They were right.

These dogs have the intelligence and guiding abilities of a retriever with the laid back, friendly, and anti-allergenic fur of a Poodle.

They are incredibly friendly animals as well and will get along with just about anybody.

They don’t mind children and will generally maintain a calm demeanor even when they are being roughhoused by even the most rambunctious kids.

This makes the Goldendoodle a wonderful family pet. They don’t shed often, they keep themselves, clean, and they can tolerate your wild kids!

Goldendoodle Puppies – Before You Buy…

You’re bound to fall in love with these fluffy canines at first sight, but if you want to make an informed decision and a good purchase, there are a few things that you need to think about first.

We’ve done our best to answer all of the most commonly asked questions!

What price are Goldendoodle Puppies?

These dogs are fairly expensive, and many buyers tend to drawback when they see the price tag. An average Goldendoodle puppy will cost you about $2500.

This is because they were specially bred to be seeing-eye dogs, and to some people their value as a daily aid is priceless.

If the Goldendoodle that you’re looking at has a brown or red tint to their fur coat, then you can expect to pay an additional $200 or possibly $400.

All in all, for a really nice Goldendoodle, expect to shell out around $3,000.

How to Find Reputable Goldendoodle Breeders?

This breed isn’t hard to find, but you do need to make sure to check your dog’s parent to make sure that you aren’t getting ripped off by a shiesty breeder.

Thankfully, this animal is a relatively hard dog to fake. The parents should always be one purebred Golden Retriever and a purebred Poodle.

Anything else does not qualify as an authentic Goldendoodle and is not worth the hefty price tag.

These dogs are best purchased as puppies. If you wait till they grow older, it can be harder for them to form a lasting bond with their owners.

This is especially important if you are getting this dog as a service dog for somebody that you care for.

3 Little-known facts about Goldendoodle puppies

  1. Goldendoodles were bred in the late 1990’s to provide a service dog option for people who had allergies and couldn’t be around other breeds.
  2. As puppies, Goldendoodles are like little fluff balls. They love attention and will often come up to you while you’re sitting down or sleeping to curl up and cuddle with you.
  3. Because of their Golden Retriever heritage, they make great fetching dogs. They love chasing after balls and sticks and will bring you back about anything that you throw.

Physical Traits of the Goldendoodle

Goldendoodles are classified as a mid-sized dog, although micro breeds are available if you really want one.

They weigh between 35 and 50 pounds depending on how big their parents were. These dogs look a lot more like Poodles than they do Retrievers, and can sometimes be confused with the traditional Poodle breed.

However, their mannerisms tend to be more geared after the Golden Retriever. They have a good energy about them, and a large muscular frontward body that makes them fast and agilie.

Their fur is definitely more like the Poodle but has the beautiful golden tint that only a Golden Retriever can provide.

Some of the most beautiful Goldendoodles are the result of breeding a Poodle with a red-haired or chocolate-covered Golden Retriever.

This gives the Goldendoodle a beautiful shimmering coat of fur that’s bound to catch the eyes of everybody on the street.

How Big is a Full-Grown Goldendoodle?

These dogs have a medium-large build and are what you would expect from combining a Poodle and a Labrador.

They usually will only have a maximum weight of around 60 pounds, and most commonly weigh around the 55-pound range.

Larger Goldendoodles are usually the result if the retriever father was exceptionally large.

The Goldendoodle is always happy.

Looking at ground height, these dogs can be fairly tall. They usually stand more than 21-inches high.

At special request, many breeders will also be able to provide you with a minified version of this dog.

All they need to do to accomplish this is to find a Poodle that is a smaller size.

What is the Life Expectancy of the Goldendoodle?

The average life expectancy of these dogs is between 10 and 15 years.

If you regularly take your pet to the veterinarian for check-ups and feed them a clean, healthy diet, then they can even live up to 17 years in special cases.

If you’re spending $3,000 on a dog, then you’ll want a pet that has a decent life-expectancy. The Goldendoodles that only make it to 10 years old are usually the ones who contract a foreign disease.

This is sad, but usually only occurs on rare occasions. In general, they tend to live long happy lives, providing they’re given the right environment.

Intelligence, Temperament and Personality Traits of the Goldendoodle

These dogs have a great personality. They are almost always happy and love the attention of humans.

If you have a Goldendoodle, then you can be sure that they will always try to be the center of attention in the room. They love going outside on walks and are very social with other dogs.

They will also get along well with any other pets you may have around the house.

Unlike some breeds which will chase your house cat around the house and drive it insane, the Goldendoodle will most likely befriend your cat and form a mutually beneficial relationship with it.

These dogs are very friendly, which means that they’re not ideal as a guard dog. If somebody were to try and break into your house, the Goldendoodle would most likely try to befriend them.

However, this does make them an excellent choice if you have a large family or a bunch of kids. You will never have to worry about this breed being aggressive towards anybody in or outside of your home.

If you’re looking to buy this dog as a seeing-eye or therapy dog, you won’t be disappointed.

The Goldendoodles don’t shed much.

With proper training, your Goldendoodle will stand by your every step of the way, and won’t lead you astray or get distracted by the squirrel in your neighbor’s tree. You’ll be able to fully rely on them.

The Goldendoodle’s Diet

You should give this dog around 3 or 4 cups of food per day. This can vary depending upon their size an activity level.

The Goldendoodles that are on the smaller size and weigh around 55-60 pounds will only need about 3 cups a day, but for larger Goldendoodles that weigh 60-70 pounds, plan on feeding them at least 4 cups a day.

Their appetite will also depend a lot on their activity level. If your dog is out walking with you every day, they will be a lot more hungry than if they are kept primarily as a house pet and only get outside less than 20 minutes a day.

How Much Exercise Does a Goldendoodle Need?

The Goldendoodle doesn’t need a whole lot of outdoor time, and usually, 20 – 30-minute sessions are enough to keep them happy and healthy.

However, if you have space and time, these dogs have been known to stay outside for hours at a time.

They enjoy exploring, and if you have a swimming pool or pond, they will jump right in with no reservations.

Goldendoodle Health and Conditions

In general, the Goldendoodle is a pretty healthy dog and isn’t prone do developing diseases.

However, both the Golden Retriever and Poodles have been known to develop a hip displacement in their old age. Being a mixed breed, this makes the Goldendoodle particularly vulnerable.

This is only something that needs to be worried about in the dog’s old age, though. You usually won’t see these bone problems arise till after your dog is at least 10 years old.

Final Thoughts on the Goldendoodle

Whether you’re looking for an aid dog or you just want to introduce a happy new family member, the Goldendoodle makes a great option.

They are patient dogs that have no problem being around a crazy environment, and they love to play outside.

Their hefty price tag can turn some buyers away, but if you have the money available, then this breed is an excellent choice!

Your entire family will love it, and it’s beautiful golden tinted coat will get you compliments everywhere that you go!

Image Sources: 1, 2, 3

Info Sources: 1, 2, 3

OVERALL SUMMARY

3
Cost to Buy
10
Cuteness Level
9
Family Safety
9
Friendliness
8
Health Concerns
7.5
Life Span
7.5
Exercise Required
8
Food Required
OVERALL RATING 7.8 / 10

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