Golden Retriever Dalmatian Mix (Goldmation)

Height: 19-23 inches
Weight: 55-70 pounds
Lifespan: 10-12 years
Colors: Gold, pied, black
Suitable for: Families with kids, watchdog, active singles
Temperament: Friendly, playful, intelligent

Goldmations, or a Goldmatian, is a hybrid combination of two intelligent and sweet-natured dogs. The parents of these pups are the Golden Retriever and the Dalmatian. They make ideal pets for families or singles that lead active lifestyles because they need plenty of physical and mental stimulation.

These pups can be trained to make excellent watchdogs, although they are non-aggressive and don’t pose a danger to passersby. The Goldmation needs interaction throughout the day and shouldn’t be left for too long without any kind of stimulation. They still have the laidback attitude of the Golden Retriever, so overall, they are calm and gentle.

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Golden Retriever Dalmatian Mix Puppies — Before You Buy…

Energy
Trainability
Health
Lifespan
Sociability

What’s the Price of Dalmatian Golden Retriever Puppies?

The price of Goldmation puppy averages around $900 from breeders with a high standard and good reputation. However, their cost can range anywhere from $300 to $3,000, depending on the breeder and their parents’ pedigrees.

The price of a Golden Retriever Dalmatian Mix is less in regions where Dalmatians are more common. The breed is a beloved pet in some areas, while others rarely have any around.

Since Golden Retrievers are one of the most popular dogs worldwide, not to mention North America, it is not difficult to find breeders of them or their mixes. Their popularity is more likely to run the price up than the challenge of finding a breeder for them.

It is essential to try and find a high-quality breeder who treats their dogs well. It is best to ask for a tour around their facility to ensure that they are the kind of breeder whom you want to support the adoption. They should be willing to show you around any area in which they allow their dogs.

Beyond receiving a facility tour, verify the parents’ paperwork and breed before the official adoption. Ask to see the veterinary records for the dogs too. It will help you be more prepared as your pup grows older and you can keep an eye out for potential inherited diseases.

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3 Little-Known Facts About the Golden Retriever Dalmatian Mix

1. The Dalmatian is thought to be a mysterious breed because their history is relatively unknown.

The Dalmatian is a unique-looking breed that has gone through a large range of popularity in North America. They originally hail from the country of Dalmatia, which was in the Mediterranean. It is part of Croatia and is a region along the sea and some islands in the Adriatic Sea.

Most people do not know much about the Dalmatian beyond what they seem to be in the movies. They are most noteworthy for their athleticism. They are an agile breed that can build up quite a bit of speed and endurance.

Dalmatians have always been hard workers and have been used in a wide variety of roles. They have been hunters, war dogs, herding pups, protectors, and draft dogs. They are primarily known as being a companion to firefighters nowadays because they are extremely loyal and fearless.

Their popularity has ranged. When they were first introduced to America, they quickly grew in popularity because they looked so unique. However, in the 1900s, more and more breeds started making their way to American shores, and the Dalmatian became less popular.

They saw a spike when their movies came out, only to have people find that they weren’t what they thought that they would be.

Dalmatians need plenty of time with their family or caretakers. They bond strongly and cannot be left alone for long at all. They are also active and need quite plenty of daily activity to stay well behaved.

2. Golden Retrievers originally come from Scotland.

Golden Retrievers have remained one of the most popular breeds in North America for many years. Most of this is because of their charming personality and laidback characteristics.

These beautiful dogs originate from Scotland, having been bred by Lord Tweddmouth in the 1800s. He was a viscount who ended up adopting a dog named Nous. This puppy was young and yellow and had wavy hair all over. Interestingly, Nous came from a litter of black puppies.

Lord Tweedmouth began to breed Nous by crossing the dog with a Tweed Water Spaniel, a breed that has since become extinct. Other crosses occurred after this, but these two were the primary parents of what would become one of the world’s most beloved breeds.

The AKC recognized the Golden Retriever in 1925, and they currently rank number three in overall popularity compared to the other 196 breeds recognized by the AKC now.

3. Goldmations need plenty of time with their family and shouldn’t be left alone frequently.

Goldmatians, like any hybrid, is a mix of both of their parents. Both the Golden Retriever and the Dalmatian are devoted dogs who need plenty of time with their family. The Goldmatian inherits all of this and requires plenty of time spent with their humans.

What this means is that they shouldn’t be left alone for too long. They need to be walked throughout the day and don’t do well if simply kenneled and alone all day. If you can’t be around, it might be necessary to use a dog walker.

golden retriever-dalmatian
The parent breeds of the Goldmation | Left: Golden Retriever, Right: Dalmatian (Source: Pixabay)

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Temperament & Intelligence of the Goldmation

The Goldmatian is a bundle full of happiness and action. They are not incredibly hyper dogs, but they do need plenty of activity to stay satisfied from day to day. They can be quite rambunctious, especially as puppies.

These dogs are brilliant, inheriting smarts from both sides of the family. This intelligence can make them somewhat difficult to train if they decide to be stubborn. It can also get them into trouble if they are left to their own devices for too long.

Are These Dogs Good for Families? 👪

These dogs can be a good choice for families of all ages and sizes. Dalmatian Golden Retriever Mixes are gentle-natured and quickly learn where it is appropriate to be rambunctious and where it is best to remain calm. If they are socialized early on, they will do well around both kids and adults. Around strangers, they will bark loudly but typically behave in a non-aggressive manner.

Does This Breed Get Along With Other Pets?

The Goldmatian can get along well with most other animals if they are trained appropriately. They need to receive socialization early on to understand how to behave well around other animals.

They like to play around and have fun, so they often do better in a home with more than one dog. Around other animals, such as cats or rodents, observe them because they have a higher prey drive.

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Things to Know When Owning a Golden Retriever Dalmatian Mix

Food & Diet Requirements 🦴

With the medium to the large size of this dog and their insatiable desire for continuous movement, they can develop quite the appetite. They need around 3 cups of high-quality food each day. It is especially important to give them food with a higher amount of protein than the average commercially-produced food.

Since this would be too much food to feed at one meal, it is best to split their mealtimes up into two or three segments each day. Give them time to digest, and do not allow them to free feed. Often, they will want to eat at all at once if it is left out.

Exercise 🐕

The Goldmation is a high-energy breed that needs plenty of exercise to stay out of mischief. They should get about 75 minutes of activity each day, and at least half of it should be focused and more intense exercise.

These dogs are highly athletic, so there is a wide range of activities that you can do to get them the exercise they need each day. You can take them on multiple walks each day, go running, hiking, swimming, or to the dog park. If walking is your go-to exercise, try to hit around 14 miles each week.

Training 🎾

Training these pups goes well if you can incorporate activity and action into it. They are well-suited to agility and obedience training and often will want to please you more than anything. The primary concern is that they do not become bored with what you are working on. You could try a fun puzzle toy to keep them entertained.

Grooming ✂️

Both the Dalmatian and the Golden Retriever have coats that shed quite a bit. They are also prone to moderate amounts of drooling and can develop a doggy odor as well.

It is best if you brush them multiple times a week. Giving them a monthly bath also helps get rid of any dog smell they might develop. Use a delicate and kind shampoo for their skin, so it doesn’t begin to dry out.

Besides paying attention to their coat, it is beneficial to keep track of their ears, nails, and teeth.

Check their ears and gently clean them out once a week with a soft cloth. If their nails do not wear down from natural activity, then clip them at least once a month or when you start to hear them click against the floor. Their teeth should be cleaned once a week, at the minimum.

Health and Conditions 🏥

Overall, these dogs are a pretty robust breed. They come from two hardy parent breeds and benefit from hybrid vigor. It is still good practice to keep an eye out for genetic disorders that are more common for Retrievers or Dalmatians.

Minor Conditions
  • Entropion
  • Deafness
  • Allergies
Serious Conditions
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Renal dysplasia
  • Epilepsy

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Male vs. Female

There are currently no recognizable differences between males and females in this breed.

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Final Thoughts

People who are highly active or have families with kids who need an exercise partner will love having a dog like a Goldmatian. They are loving, loyal, and protective without having an aggressive personality.

These pups are unique not only in their physical appearance but their energetic yet laidback natures. They absolutely have to find a home with active families that have plenty of time to spend with them each day.


Featured Image Credit | Left: Golden Retriever (Free-Photos, Pixabay), Right: Dalmatian (Free-Photos moncakk, Shutterstock)