The Eurasier: A Complete Guide

The Eurasier is the product of crosses between the Wolf Spitz, the Chow Chow, and the Samoyed.

The Eurasier is loyal to his family but needs some time to warm up to people. He’s usually not aggressive towards strangers, but he doesn’t like them to pet him.

If you want a dog that loves everyone at first sight, don’t choose a Eurasier.

When they belong to a family, the Eurasier is very patient with children and other animals in the household.

He’s a good watchdog. He’s very alert and observant but will not make a lot of noise. Early and frequent socialization will help you bring out the best in your Eurasier.

The Eurasier’s activity requirements is quite low and can live happily in a big or a small home.

One or two brief walks daily will satisfy his exercise needs.

This is an intelligent dog that is willing to learn. He responds well to clicker training and positive reinforcement techniques.

The Eurasier is quite easy to groom, even if he has a lot of coat. He will shed heavily, and the only other grooming he will need is regular dental hygiene, ear cleaning, and nail trimming.

Eurasier Puppies – Before You Buy…

The Eurasier has been commonly used as a therapy dog.

What Price are Eurasier Puppies?

The price of Eurasier puppies is between $800 and $1,000.

How to Find Reputable Eurasier Breeders?

Whether you are still choosing between several dog breeds or have already set your sights on a

Eurasier, a dog show is a good starting place.This is an opportunity for you to meet many dogs under high-stress circumstances.

You’ll get a good sense of which breeds are relaxed and which ones are high strung. You will also see the breeders and handlers in action.

You can speak with dog handlers there, and they can refer you to other good breeders that they know.

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You can gain more in-depth information about the breed from the breed clubs. They support breed-specific research, rescue programs, and breed maintenance.

They also offer breeder referral listings with links to the member breeder’s websites or contact information.

3 Little-Facts About Eurasier Puppies

  1. The Eurasier was developed in the ’60s to be a gentle family dog and protector.
  2. Originally called the Wolf Chow, it was given the name Eurasier to symbolize their combined European and Asian heritage.
  3. The dogs are popular in Germany and Switzerland, but not so in the United States.

Physical Traits of the Eurasier

The Eurasier is a highly intelligent, gentle and calm dog.

The Eurasier is very similar in appearance to other Spitz-type dogs, although its appearance is quite distinct.

Many of these dogs closely resemble the Chow Chow, and most people would probably mistake them for a Chow mix.

The Eurasier is a medium-sized dog. Most of its body is obscured beneath its long, dense coat.

The tail of the Eurasier is quite long. It’s always held over the back. It can be bent or curled sideways, or it can be straightforward.

The head and face of the Eurasier are somewhat variable, with some looking at lot like the Chow Chow and others looking much more like the Wolfspitz.

The muzzle and skull are barely distinct and blend in almost seamlessly. But its hair often makes it appear flat-faced.

Its nose is black and medium-sized. The ears are naturally erect, medium in size, triangular, and slightly rounded at the tips.

The eyes are also medium in size. They are dark in color and obliquely set.

The coat of the Eurasier is probably the breed’s most important feature. The undercoat is short, soft, and very thick. The outer coat is loose and can be medium or long.

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The hair on the muzzle, face, ears, and fronts of the legs is short, while the hair on the tail, backs of the legs, and thighs is long and flowing.

Eurasiers may have white patches. They can also be pure white or solid liver.

How Big is a Full-Grown Eurasier?

Male Eurasiers weigh between 51 and 71 pounds and stand approximately 20 to 24 inches tall.

Females are smaller and lighter, weighing between 40 and 57 pounds and standing 19 to 22 inches tall.

What is the Life Expectancy of the Eurasier?

The life expectancy for the Eurasier is 12 to 14 years.

Intelligence, Temperament and Personality Traits of the Eurasier

The Eurasier is the mix of the Wolf Spitz, the Chow Chow, and the Samoyed.

The self-assured and calm Eurasier wants nothing more than to be close to his family.

He is a vigilant and alert protector. He can be reserved but not aggressive when it comes to strangers. He does best in a family where someone is home during the day.

The Eurasier will enjoy going to different places with his humans, but he’s not especially fond of meeting people he doesn’t know.

This is a dog who takes his time deciding whether he likes someone or not. The Eurasier is a calm and well-mannered dog that forms strong bonds with family.

He may be a little wary around strangers until he gets to know them, but he is not timid or aggressive.

Early socialization will help this dog grow friendly and well-adjusted around strange animals and people.

The Eurasier requires a lot of attention and time with family. They do not do well being alone for long periods.

He can be trained as a therapy dog. They generally do well with children and other pets. The Eurasier usually forms strong bonds with all the members of the family.

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However, this breed is far from needy. Most Eurasiers are dogs that want to be in the same room as their owners but not necessarily right next to them.

Although the Eurasier is an affectionate breed, few would be described as fawning. Dog aggression is quite rare in the Eurasier.

Early socialization is also very important. The sooner a Eurasier is introduced to many new people, animals, sounds, places, and situations, the better.

It will help them with their own adjustment periods and not get stressed with everything they encounter later in their lives.

Eurasiers are naturally wary of people they meet for the first time. They would never show aggressive behavior, though.

They will just keep their distance and let their humans know they are not happy about it.

They are sensitive dogs by nature. They do not respond well to harsh corrections or any other kind of heavy-handed training methods.

They are very good family dogs for families where at least one person stays at home.

They thrive on human contact and don’t do well when they are left on their own for any length of time.

The Eurasier’s Diet

The Eurasier is a medium-sized dog that should be fed a high-quality diet formulated to meet their nutritional needs.

Unfortunately, most pet food companies do not have specific formulas for medium-sized dogs, so you may need to go with a standard adult formula instead.

The Eurasier is not highly active, and it is not classified as a working breed. An active breed formula is not necessary.

How Much Exercise Does a Eurasier Need?

The Eurasier is not a very active dog. In fact, many Eurasier owners describe them as lazy.

A 30-minute or an hour’s walk once a day is plenty of exercise for this breed, though it will also appreciate some active playtime indoors or in the backyard.

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Most average dog-loving families will be able to meet the exercise requirements of this dog without being burdened.

Although the Eurasier does not need much exercise, they can develop behavioral problems if they are not provided with enough exercise.

He is physically capable and will happily accompany you on hikes up the mountains or other enjoyable and rigorous activities.

Eurasier Health and Conditions

Some of the known issues that may affect this breed include eye problems, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation, entropion, ectropion, distichiasis, progressive retinal atrophy, elbow dysplasia, and hip dysplasia.

Grooming Advice

As with any other pet, if you get a Eurasier pup you need to be spot on with the way you keep it and groom it throughout the course of its life.

If you keep your dog clean and well groomed it can effectively save your dog from a lot of different diseases that dogs pick up just because their owners are careless.

Even though the Eurasier has a double coat, this does not necessarily mean that you would have to brush your pup more often than usual.

Just brushing your dog once or twice a week will be enough to keep the dead hairs at bay and the coat clean from any dirt or debris.

When it comes to shedding the Eurasier only sheds twice a year, but when the season hits you can expect a lot of fur around the house.

It is therefore advised that you increase the times you brush your pup so that you can get rid of the dead hair yourself.

You can use both a pin brush and a comb to brush the coat of your Eurasier pup, spring and fall are two seasons when you can expect the most shedding.

Eurasier is a relatively low maintenance dog that does not require very frequent bathing, bathing him twice a year should be enough to keep this dog clean.

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Bathing your Eurasier pup during the shedding season may help ease the removal of excess and dead hair so that it becomes much easier for you and your dog to handle.

One of the most important things you need to keep a check on is your dog’s ears because this is where bacteria can usually grow.

Cleaning your dog’s ears once a week if they are dirty should be enough to keep any harmful diseases away.

My Final Thoughts on the Eurasier

The Eurasier may not have fulfilled his role as a working dog, but his inborn affinity and affection to humans have paid off.

Today, he is also known as a therapy dog.

He is used in nursing homes, hospices, retirement homes, special schools, and hospitals to give much-needed joy, comfort, stimulus, and help to the people there.

Depending on the need, they can well serve as service or assistance dogs.

They are highly intelligent, gentle, calm, cheerful, and above all, they love to spend time together with their loved ones, which make them perfect for this noble job.

All in all, the Eurasier is indeed a noble dog with a joyful spirit.

The Eurasier is known for his devoted and affectionate personality. They are literally in love with their human families.

This dog will equally respect and love all other members of the household. To him, all family members are his relatives.

Eurasiers will always strive to be together with his family and will gladly follow you wherever you go.

Image Sources: 1, 2, 3

OVERALL SUMMARY

5.5
Cost to Buy
10
Cuteness Level
8.5
Family Safety
6.5
Friendliness
7
Health Concerns
6.5
Life Span
9
Exercise Required
4.5
Food Required
OVERALL RATING 7.2 / 10

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