Can Dogs Eat Oatmeal Cookies? Are Oatmeal Cookies Safe for Dogs?

While not as popular as their chocolate chip cousins, oatmeal cookies hold a special place in the hearts of many. They’re often loved for their chewy textures with that hearty, wholesome taste that only oatmeal can provide.

But are they good to share with your dog? Not so much.

And it has nothing to do with the oatmeal. Actually, the oatmeal would be the best part about it. However, it takes more than oats to build the best cookie. Other ingredients such as chocolate, raisins, and sugar are detrimental to your pup’s health and overall well-being.

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How is Chocolate Bad for Dogs?

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You probably already know that chocolate can be very dangerous for dogs. But why? Chocolate contains a compound known as theobromine. This substance cannot be processed by your dog’s body and can do some serious damage inside of them.

Accidental ingestion can lead to fast heart rates, muscle spasms, vomiting, and seizures. It can even be fatal in large quantities. So, while chocolate chips might be a great addition to your oatmeal cookie, it’s downright terrible for your pooch.

Why Are Raisins Dangerous for Dogs?

Oatmeal raisin cookies are a classic staple in most homes, but did you know that they can be even worse for your dog than chocolate?

Raisins have been shown to lead to some serious kidney complications for dogs. And your pup doesn’t even need to eat them in excess. A single gram of raisins (or grapes for that matter) for every 2 pounds of your dog’s weight can lead to big problems. But that’s not the most chilling part about them. It’s the fact that scientists and veterinarians are still trying to figure out why.

Nobody knows the exact reason raisins and grapes affect dogs so much. However, it’s best to steer clear completely.

What Happens If My Dog Eats Too Much Sugar?

Ok, so no add-ins. What if you’re an oatmeal cookie purist and only enjoy plain cookies? Can you still share them with your pup?

Unfortunately, they’re probably loaded with sugar. Sugar isn’t great for your pup either. Too much can quickly lead to doggy diabetes and obesity over the long run. And that doesn’t mean that artificial sweeteners are in the clear either.

In fact, xylitol—an artificial sweetener—can cause severe drops in blood pressure and cause liver and pancreas failure. So, here’s the bottom line when it comes to oatmeal cookies:

keep them away from your dog!

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Image Credit By: Olesia8383, shutterstock

Can Dogs Eat Oatmeal?

Now, if you were to just feed your pup oats, then you’ll be doing them a favor. Oats when incorporated into your dog’s regular healthy diet can add a super boost to their nutrition. They are packed full of fiber and can have complex carbs to help regulate your pupper’s gut health.

Not to mention, they’ve got plenty of vitamins and minerals like zinc, B-complex vitamins, and iron to keep your pooch energized and ready to go.

If you do plan on feeding your dog some oatmeal, follow these simple rules.

  • Cook it first: Raw oats may be great for us; however, it’s best to cook them for your dog. Their digestive system doesn’t work quite like ours and prefers its oats cooked.
  • Use whole grain oats: The less processing done to your dog’s oatmeal, the better. Whole grain oats simply provide more health benefits.
  • Ensure there are no other added ingredients: You want to make sure that there is no added sugar or flavorings when feeding your pup oatmeal. These can be harmful to them.
  • Use dog-friendly toppings: If you’re really looking to spoil your pup, add some canine-friendly mix-ins such as no-sugar-added peanut butter, plain yogurt, cinnamon, pumpkin, or sunflower seeds (sans shell).
  • Lentils

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Oatmeal for Dogs

While oatmeal cookies may be among some of the worst foods your dog can eat, the same can’t be said about plain oatmeal. Oatmeal has a ton of great benefits that your pooch can take advantage of. However, you’ll need to steer clear of any risky mix-ins or added sugars.


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