The Cadoodle: A Complete Guide

If you know what to look for in your ideal dog breed, then the search will end up going much more smoothly for you than it otherwise would.

You will find that there are many breeds to choose from, and each of them has their own set of unique characteristics. Today, I’ll be going over the Cadoodle.

The Cadoodle is a dog breed that consists of a mix between the Collie and the Poodle, two breeds that are highly respected and are often used for cross breeding.

It is somewhat of a surprise that the Cadoodle is not more popular, but it makes sense when you consider the opposing status of its parents.

While the Poodle is mostly seen as a classy dog that is rather expensive, the Collie is more of a workman’s dog, being perceived as affordable and steadfast, though pure Collies can get pricey.

These two breeds come together to make for a rather interesting mix, so let’s take a look at it.

Cadoodle Puppies – Before You Buy…

A Cadoodle can be really energetic.

The primary things that you will want to consider before buying Cadoodle puppies will be covered in this section of the guide.

I’ll be taking a look at how much these puppies usually go for, the best place to find them, and I’ll also be going over some facts that you may not know about the Cadoodle.

What Price are Cadoodle Puppies?

Even though they are part Collie, which is one of the most affordable dog breeds in the world, you have to account for the Poodle half of one of these dogs.

The Cadoodle will typically be slightly pricey if its Poodle parent is pure-blooded, and the price can vary quite highly based on the pedigree.

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The average price of a Cadoodle puppy is usually somewhere around 1000 dollars, but that can fluctuate either lower or higher depending on the demand in your locality.

If Cadoodles aren’t a particularly popular breed, the prices will be lower, but you will also have issues finding a breeder, which brings us to our next point.

How to Find a Reputable Cadoodle Breeder?

If you are convinced that the Cadoodle is the right dog for you and there is nothing that I can do to change your mind, then you will probably want to find the nearest breeder.

Many prospective dog owners don’t know that this is usually one of the most significant hurdles when it comes to finding the right dog.

Cadoodle breeders are not as common as breeders for other Poodle mixes, so they may be a little harder to come across unless you live near a big city.

If you want to make sure that a breeder is reliable and trustworthy, you should make multiple visits to their home before you make your purchase so you can get to know them better.

3 Little Known Facts About Cadoodle Puppies

  1. If these puppies have a high enough percentage of Poodle genes, they are highly hypoallergenic thanks to the hair-like consistency of their fur. Poodles are prized for their allergen-free coat, and it often transfers to Cadoodles as well, though it doesn’t occur in every case.
  2. Even when they are younger Cadoodles tend to be split between two personality types. The first possibility is that these dogs inherit the proud nature of their Poodle parent or they may also end up being playful and energetic like Collies. This usually varies on a dog-to-dog basis.
  3. Cadoodle puppies tend to grow a lot faster than puppies of smaller dog breeds. Don’t be surprised if you notice the difference in the size of your puppy over the course of a month or even a few weeks. You will have to be ready for a fast grower when you bring a Cadoodle into the home.
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Physical Traits of the Cadoodle

The Cadoodle breed grows really fast.

The Cadoodle is a larger dog breed that has the measured poise of a Poodle, so you will find that they tend to stand tall and proud.

Being a mixed breed, you will see that their visual traits can range immensely as they are highly dependent on the degree to which they are mixed.

True 50/50 Cadoodles tend to inherit a pretty equal mix of features from their parents, with the recognizable Poodle-like fur being the most noticeable aspect of this dog.

Apart from the fur, you will find that Cadoodles often have a shorter snout than is common in their parent breeds, with a pronounced bump.

The ears of the Cadoodle will vary from dog to dog with some of them being floppy and others being a little straighter.

These dogs will require an intense grooming schedule, as you can already expect from a descendant of the Poodle, a dog with incredibly high-maintenance fur.

How Big is a Full Grown Cadoodle?

If you want to buy one of these dogs, it only makes sense that you will want to know how big they get.

I wouldn’t recommend a Cadoodle for people who live in smaller apartments, as this is a larger breed that will struggle with claustrophobia in environments that are a little more enclosed.

The Cadoodle can usually weigh somewhere between 50 and 70 pounds, making for a dog that is in the medium to a high range when it comes to weight.

This breed typically has a height of around 20 inches to 25 inches since both of the parent breeds are within that size range, though Collies can get a little smaller.

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What is the Life Expectancy of the Cadoodle?

When looking for your next best friend, you will want to be sure that you won’t end up losing it too soon, so it always helps to know how long you can expect your dog to be part of your family.

Even though this is a larger dog breed, the Cadoodle lives for far longer than most other similarly-sized canines.

A Cadoodle will usually live for around 13 to 15 years, depending on the size of the particular dog and the health of its parents.

Healthier Cadoodles have been known to live for even longer, though anything past 16 is usually very rare. If you need a large dog with a long lifespan, however, this is an excellent choice.

Intelligence, Temperament and Personality Traits of the Cadoodle

The Cadoodle is one of the smartest dogs you may come across, mainly due to its Poodle blood, as they tend to be highly intelligent as well.

When coupled with the sweet and caring nature of Collies, the Poodle makes for a great family dog that is also vigilant enough to watch over you.

While the Cadoodle may not necessarily look intimidating, it is still a relatively large dog, and Poodles were bred to be hunting dogs.

If threatened, the Cadoodle will not hesitate to defend itself, and it can get pretty vicious if it is pushed to the limit by an intruder, which may come as a surprise.

If you have children or other pets in the house, there shouldn’t be any conflicts with the Cadoodle, but I would recommend introducing them at a young age to minimize potential issues.

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Keep in mind that the Cadoodle can be a sneaky dog and they have been known to steal food.

The Cadoodle’s Diet

As the Cadoodle is a bigger dog breed, you will have to be prepared to pay a little bit more to keep it fed than a smaller dog.

This breed will usually need to eat around 3 cups of food per day, which can get costly if you intend to feed your dog premium chow, which will ensure that it stays healthy.

While high-end dog food may not be as integral for larger dogs as it is for small ones, you should at least try to mix some into your Cadoodle’s diet every now and then.

These dogs are also enamored with doggy treats. If you ever need a way to draw your Cadoodle’s attention, then you can always wave a treat around.

How Much Exercise Does the Cadoodle Need?

A Cadoodle will not hesitate to defend itself.

While the Cadoodle is an energetic dog, you will find that they are somewhat prone to unexpected bouts of laziness.

Don’t let your dog fool you when it starts acting like this, as it will still need a decent amount of exercise so that it can remain healthy and not slip into obesity.

As long as you take your Cadoodle out at least two or three times per day and you play around with it on a regular basis, it should fulfill all of its primary exercise needs.

This breed usually gets a good enough workout just from running around the house due to its tremendous amount of energy.

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Cadoodle Health and Conditions

As it is a mixed breed that is descended from relatively healthy dogs, the Cadoodle will not typically be prone to many health problems.

If you are looking to avoid a hefty vet bill, then you may want to get yourself a Cadoodle. Let’s see what the most common troubles are.

Serious Issues

  • Hip dysplasia
  • Addison’s Disease

Minor Issues

  • Eye problems
  • Allergies

My Final Thoughts on the Cadoodle

The Cadoodle is a loyal dog that is equally capable of defending your family as it is of entertaining it.

While this breed is by means a guard dog, it is still a strong, athletic, and capable breed that can do more than you would expect just by looking at it.

Thank you for reading this guide.

Image Sources: 1, 2, 3

OVERALL SUMMARY

7
Cost to Buy
8.5
Cuteness Level
6
Family Safety
6
Friendliness
9
Health Concerns
8
Life Span
7
Exercise Required
5
Food Required
OVERALL RATING 7.1 / 10

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