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Bassugg (Basset Hound & Pug Mix)

Height: 10-14 inches
Weight: 15-30 pounds
Lifespan: 12-15 years
Colors: Fawn, tan, black, white, tan
Suitable for: Relaxed families, apartment living
Temperament: Laidback, Amiable, Good-natured, Goofy

When it comes to the designer breed—the Bassugg—the word adorable doesn’t even begin to cut it. You may wonder what sorts of possibilities this cross holds. Will they have smooshed snouts? Droopy ears? Curly tails? Long bodies? The truth is—it could be any of the above. And all potential outcomes are equally as cute.

The Basset Hound and Pug combo can take on any attributes of either parent—and any attitude, too! But ultimately, these dogs are incredibly loving and people-oriented. So, let’s get down to the specifics of what you can expect from the Bassugg to see if you’ve met your perfect match.

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Bassugg Puppies – Before You Buy…

Energy
Trainability
Health
Lifespan
Sociability

What’s the Price of Bassugg Puppies?

If you find a litter of beautiful Bassugg puppies, expect a price tag of $500 to $1,200

The cost will vary depending on a few factors—like the area, vet costs, birth expenses, and specific breeder. If you find any Bassugg that seems cheap, it may be nice for your purse or wallet but probably not so good for the pup.

Low price could mean trouble when it comes to designer breeds. You have to be very careful when you select who to buy from. Seeing precious, successful litters and a solid breeding reputation helps determine just how authentic a breeder is.

Genuine breeders will likely have vet records, parents on-site, and possibly even puppy contracts. Puppy contracts are written agreements between the breeders and adoptive parents of the pup that state purchase terms.

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3 Little-Known Facts About the Bassugg

1. Basset Hounds and Pugs come from different parts of the world.

Basset Hounds come from France and Belgium while Pugs hail from China.

2. Both breeds’ names are based on their body structure.

Basset comes from the French word meaning “low.” It seems the obvious choice for this hound’s long body and short legs.

It’s widely believed that Pugs were named after the Marmoset monkey—who’s also known as the pug monkey—since they share a similar face.

3. Basset Hounds and Pugs have opposite snouts.

Basset hounds have long, extended snouts used for sniffing. Pugs have a completely smashed-in nose, making them part of the brachycephalic breed category.

One benefit of the Bassugg is that breeding this pair often levels out breathing issues.

basset hound and pug in the park
The parent breeds of the Bassugg | Left: Basset Hound (Kellymmiller73, Shutterstock); Right: Pug (marketalangova, Shutterstock)

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Temperament & Intelligence of the Bassugg

When it comes to intelligence, Pugs may fall a bit short—but they make up for it with their amiable personalities. Basset Hounds are great at tracking scents but have only fair intelligence, so they aren’t a lot of help here.

If you’re looking for canine brains above all else, you’re going to be disappointed with the lack of motivation here. But if you want a goofy, carefree dog who—while being slightly hard to train—will fill your days with laughter and entertainment, the Bassugg is for you.

As for temperament, these dogs will put a smile on your face every time. Both the Basset Hound and Pug are easy-going, glass-half-full kind of dogs. While different, they share a friendly, docile nature—both pleasing and charming.

Are These Dogs Good for Families? 👪

The Bassugg will make a top-notch addition to practically all living situations. Their Basset roots give them a knack for manning the great outdoors. The Pugs’ lackadaisical approach to life makes them a perfect couch potato when you’re ready for a cuddle buddy.

There really is so much to offer when it comes to befriending one of these dogs. They get along swimmingly with children, uncles, aunts, cousins, and grandparents. You don’t need to worry about one of these dogs being overly protective or unnecessarily aggressive.

You can have this mix in almost any living situation. They’re small and inactive enough that they adapt spectacularly to apartment living. But they are rugged and hound-ish enough to explore the woods. You can invite them on adventures with the family and they’ll happily oblige.

While these dogs do amazingly well with people of all ages, they don’t share the same sentiment with heat. Since Pugs are brachycephalic, they may have a few breathing issues that make them unsuitable for hot temperatures. If you live in a hotter climate, keeping them cool is paramount.

This cross should never be an outside dog. They are too people-oriented and temperature-sensitive. If you can’t have your dog in the house, another more durable breed may be better for you.

Does This Breed Get Along with Other Pets?

These dogs are usually fabulous counterparts for other canines—and it doesn’t stop there. They will even get along with the family cats if they are raised together respectfully.

Pugs are generally incredible with even the smallest animals since they don’t have a high prey drive. However, Bassets have been used in hunting for eons—which means little critters can be a hit or miss.

If you have your Bassugg around any rodents, poultry, or reptiles, supervise any and all interactions between them. Even though they might not be inherently aggressive, they may just get too excited seeing a chicken dart across the yard or watching your hamster roll in their ball.

These dogs are mild-tempered, so they’d likely do well in dog parks, on public walks, or in stores. However, unaltered males can sometimes show a bit of territorial aggression. Sometimes, same-sex dogs—male or female—could find it hard to get along.

That possibility is pretty rare but still relevant. Getting your Bassugg spayed or neutered can alleviate a lot of the potential for those things.

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Things to Know When Owning a Bassugg:

Food & Diet Requirements 🦴

Since the Bassugg won’t need a lot of extra calories to replenish their empty tank, you won’t have to make a lot of special adjustments for their diet. This cross will do well on a high-quality dry kibble that offers whole protein, healthy grains, fruits, and veggies in the recipe.

If you offer wet food, be sure to do so in moderation. Wet food is typically much higher in caloric content, making it easy to pack on pounds. It can serve as a mouth-watering kibble topper or weekly snack but shouldn’t be a stand-alone diet.

You can also try your hand at making homemade dog food. This method gives you more control over what’s in your dog’s food bowl—and may even be healthier if you make the food correctly. There are plenty of online recipes you can test out.

As for a Bassugg’s ever-loving snack menu, try to offer healthy treats like fresh carrots, dehydrated meats, or apples.

If you are looking for a few great suggestions, each of these posts offer some ideal choices:

Exercise 🐕

If you’re looking for a jogging buddy, the Bassugg is not a top contender. These dogs are going to love lounging in your lap, taking leisurely strolls, and napping on the porch. They can get frisky and love to romp around in intervals. But overall, their energy is moderate to low.

Pugs require a total of 45 minutes to an hour of activity, but it should never be high intensity. Since Pugs suffer from breathing issues, they can overheat very easily. Always limit times of ultra-high energy playing in case they favor a Pug in this sense.

Basset Hounds also need about an hour of exercise per day. You have to be careful of high-intensity training with this breed, too—but for a different reason. Bassets have long backs and short legs. Agility activities or hard running can damage the spine over time, leading to more significant issues.

So, it’s pretty safe to say exercise should be about an hour—and a slow jaunt through the park is plenty.

Do be careful not to encourage long periods of laziness since both of these breeds are prone to obesity. Even if you have to coax them to get their workout, it’s essential to their well-being (no matter what they tell you).

Training 🎾

Training your Bassugg can be a bit tricky. First things first—they are going to have a mind of their own. Despite their inept desire to please you at every turn, they won’t be able to help themselves sometimes. If they aren’t in the mood for whatever’s on the to-do list, they simply might not comply.

Bassets are scent dogs, which means they’ve been hot on the trail tracking wild game for centuries. So, training these sorts of tasks may work well. But they’re also hard-headed when they want to be.

Pugs—bless their hearts—are easily distracted, easily bored, and easily persuaded by mischief. These dogs are not a breeze to train. It takes consistency and patience to do so.

When you combine the two, you have a dog that will probably be a challenge, and may even be slow to learn. That will vary from puppy to puppy, but ultimately—expect some drawbacks.

Since both breeds are food-motivated, you might be able to keep their attention longer if you bribe them with snacks.

Grooming ✂️

When you have a Bassugg, there are so many features of each parent that can show through physically. While this cross can take after one parent or another, they can also have different fur texture and length.

Both breeds are high shedding. Fawn Pugs have a double coat, which means they have a shorter, thicker undercoat with a longer overcoat—which sheds all year round. Basset Hounds have short, smooth coats that also shed regularly.

So, to avoid hair all over the furniture, brushing your Bassugg daily can help. Brushing won’t ever take care of the issue completely, but it can reduce dead hair. Using a de-shedding tool once a month can also take care of a stubborn undercoat if your Bassugg got the double-coat trait.

Your Bassugg will also need their nails trimmed as needed. Be careful to cut bit by bit, so you don’t clip too far down to the quick

Health and Conditions 🏥

Every breed poses unique health concerns that seem to be more likely to develop. With the Bassugg, you’ll have a wider range of possible ailments because they can take on issues from either side.

Keep in mind, they may be perfectly healthy with no problem. It will vary, but here are the most common health issues you may run into.

Minor Conditions
  • Obesity
  • Allergies
  • Breathing Attacks
  • Eye Problems
Serious Conditions
  • Cancer
  • Pug Dog Encephalitis
  • Digestive Issues
  • Osteochondrosis Disseans
  • Thrombopathia
  • Hip Dysplasia

Serious Conditions:

  • Cancer — these dogs can run into specific types of cancer over their lifetime
  • Pug Dog Encephalitis a rare genetic condition that affects small breeds. It causes inflammation of the brain, leading to death
  • Digestive Issues — food sensitivities and GI tract problems are common for both breeds
  • Osteochondrosis Disseans — a condition that restricts blood flow to the joints, causing the cartilage to die
  • Thrombopathia — a platelet disorder from the Basset Hound side
  • Hip Dysplasia — a painful deteriorative condition that affects the joints and hips

Minor Conditions:

  • Obesity — weight gain that can lead to other health issues
  • Allergies — food and environmental sensitivities
  • Breathing Attacks — reverse sneezing, tracheal problems
  • Eye Problems — glaucoma, cataracts, blindness

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Male vs. Female

Both male and female Bassuggs are equally wonderful companions. While there isn’t a ton of difference between the sexes, there may be some things to note.

Generally, males are bigger than females in both the Basset Hound and Pug. But because Bassets are larger than Pugs, either is possible depending on which parent they take after.

Males can be a bit more challenging to train, as they can be willful and stubborn. Females are usually more receptive in this arena because they intuitively understand when you mean business.

However, males tend to be a bit more lovable than females. Even though both are sweet, females have a bit of a spunkier personality. She can also be more particular about when and how she wants your attention.

Unaltered males have marking tendencies, especially from the Pug side of things. Early neutering should take care of this habit.

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Final Thoughts

So, there you have it—the Bassug in all its glory. Does this laidback, relaxed pooch sound like a good fit for your lifestyle? If your light is still green, remember to check local shelters and rescues for a homeless Bassugg who needs a world of loving.

If you do select a breeder, make sure they’re reputable and authentic. Whichever way you track down one of these cute little buggers, know that you’ll have found a friend for life.

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Featured Image Credit: Left – Basset Hound (Victoria Rak, Shutterstock), Right – Pug (Ezzolo, Shutterstock)